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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
London Borough of Camden in Greater London County, England, United Kingdom
 

Vera Brittain and Winifred Holtby

 
 
Vera Brittain and Winifred Holtby Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, October 12, 2017
1. Vera Brittain and Winifred Holtby Marker
Inscription.
Vera
Brittain
1893-1970
Winifred
Holtby
1898-1935
Writers and Reformers
lived here

 
Erected 1995 by English Heritage.
 
Location. 51° 31.387′ N, 0° 6.955′ W. Marker is in London Borough of Camden, England, in Greater London County. Marker is on Doughty Street 0.1 kilometers south of Guilford Street, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 58 Doughty Street, London Borough of Camden, England WC1N 2LS, United Kingdom.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Sydney Smith (about 90 meters away, measured in a direct line); The White Conduit (about 180 meters away); Charlotte Mew (about 210 meters away); Benjamin Disraeli (about 210 meters away); John Howard (approx. 0.2 kilometers away); R.H. Tawney (approx. 0.3 kilometers away); Sir Syed Ahmed Khan (approx. 0.3 kilometers away); Horizon Magazine (approx. 0.3 kilometers away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in London Borough of Camden.
 
Also see . . .
1. Vera Mary Brittain (Poetry Foundation). "Vera Brittain’s reputation centers on her achievements as an influential British feminist
Vera Brittain and Winifred Holtby Marker - Wide View image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, October 12, 2017
2. Vera Brittain and Winifred Holtby Marker - Wide View
and pacifist and on her famous memoir of World War I, Testament of Youth: An Autobiographical Study of the Years 1900-1925. That work has never been out of print since first published in 1933, and its influence has been strengthened by a 1979 BBC television adaptation and new paperback editions. During her lifetime Brittain was also known internationally as a successful journalist, poet, public speaker, biographer, autobiographer, and novelist. Interest in her writings, personality, and relationships (notably her close friendship with Winifred Holtby) has grown steadily, especially among feminist critics,...." (Submitted on November 19, 2017.) 

2. Winifred Holtby (Wikipedia). "Winifred Holtby (23 June 1898 – 29 September 1935) was an English novelist and journalist, now best known for her novel South Riding, which was posthumously published in 1936....Holtby's fame was derived mainly from her journalism: she was prolific and over the next decade and a half she wrote for more than 20 newspapers and magazines, including the feminist journal Time and Tide (also serving on the board of directors) and the Manchester Guardian newspaper. She also wrote a regular weekly column for the trade union magazine The Schoolmistress. Her books during this period included two novels, Poor Caroline (1931), Mandoa! Mandoa! (1933), a critical study of Virginia Woolf (1932) and a volume of short stories, Truth is Not Sober (1934)....Holtby was, together with Brittain, an ardent feminist, socialist and pacifist. She lectured extensively for the League of Nations Union and was a member of the feminist Six Point Group. She was active in the Independent Labour Party and was a staunch campaigner for the unionisation of black workers in South Africa....As well as her journalism, Holtby wrote 14 books, including six novels; two volumes of short stories; the first critical study of Virginia Woolf (1932) and Women and a Changing Civilization (1934), a feminist survey with opinions that are still relevant. She also wrote poetry....Holtby is best remembered for her novel, South Riding, edited by Vera Brittain and published posthumously in March 1936, which received high praise from the critics. The book won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize for 1936 and has never been out of print. In 1938, it was made into a film directed by Victor Saville, in 1974 it was adapted by Stan Barstow for Yorkshire Television and in 2011, BBC One produced a three-part dramatisation by Andrew Davies. There have also been several radio adaptations, the most recent for BBC Radio Four in 2005." (Submitted on November 19, 2017.) 
 
Categories. Arts, Letters, MusicCharity & Public WorkPeaceWomen
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 19, 2017. This page originally submitted on November 19, 2017, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 47 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on November 19, 2017, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California.
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