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Port Tobacco in Charles County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

John Wilkes Booth

Escape of an Assassin

 

—War on the Chesapeake Bay —

 
John Wilkes Booth Marker image. Click for full size.
By Roger Dean Meyer, April 28, 2007
1. John Wilkes Booth Marker
Inscription. Divided loyalties and ironies tore at Marylander’s hearts throughout the Civil War: enslaved African-Americans and free United States Colored Troops; spies and smugglers; civilians imprisoned without trial to protect freedom; neighbors and families at odds in Maryland and faraway battlefields. From the Eastern Shore to the suburbs of Washington, eastern Maryland endured those strains of civil war in ways difficult to imagine today.

Those strains continued even after Confederate General Robert E. Lee’s surrender at Appomattox. John Wilkes Booth used the help of Southern Maryland’s Confederate underground during his flight from Washington, D.C. after shooting President Abraham Lincoln on April 14, 1865.

Discover the story of Booth’s escape and other fascinating history for yourself as you drive through some of Maryland’s prettiest countryside and most charming small towns. Follow the sign of the bugle to learn about the war on the Chesapeake, visit the site of the war’s largest prison camp and follow Booth to his eventual capture south of the Potomac River.

Please drive carefully as you enjoy the history and beauty of Maryland’s Civil War Trails.

Photo Captions: John Wilkes Booth • Mary E. Surratt • Dr. Samuel A. Mudd • Company of the 4th USCT, one of several infantry units
Port Tobacco and John Wilkes Booth Markers in front of Old Court House image. Click for full size.
By Roger Dean Meyer, March 18, 2007
2. Port Tobacco and John Wilkes Booth Markers in front of Old Court House
formed in Maryland • Frederick Douglass • Harriet Tubman • Booth limps across the stage after shooting Lincoln.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Battlefield Trails - Civil War, and the Maryland Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 38° 30.671′ N, 77° 1.194′ W. Marker is in Port Tobacco, Maryland, in Charles County. Marker can be reached from Chapel Point Road, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is located at the entrance to the Port Tobacco Court House Historic Site on the edge of the parking lot near the old well. Marker is in this post office area: Port Tobacco MD 20677, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Port Tobacco (here, next to this marker); On to Yorktown (a few steps from this marker); St. Columba Masonic Lodge (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Port Tobacco (approx. 0.3 miles away); Rose Hill (approx. 0.9 miles away); a different marker also named Rose Hill (approx. 0.9 miles away); Mulberry Grove - Birthplace of John Hanson (approx. 1.1 miles away); The Retreat (approx. 1.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Port Tobacco.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. To better
Close up view of Map and Photos on John Wilkes Booth Marker image. Click for full size.
By Roger Dean Meyer, April 28, 2007
3. Close up view of Map and Photos on John Wilkes Booth Marker
understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Also see . . .  Abraham Lincoln Research Site, John Wilkes Booth. (Submitted on June 8, 2007, by Roger Dean Meyer of Yankton, South Dakota.)
 
Additional keywords. Abraham Lincoln assassination
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 8, 2007, by Roger Dean Meyer of Yankton, South Dakota. This page has been viewed 3,276 times since then and 112 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on June 8, 2007, by Roger Dean Meyer of Yankton, South Dakota. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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