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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Plummer in Benewah County, Idaho — The American West (Mountains)
 

Hnpetptqwe'n Wayside

“Place for Racing”

 
 
Hnpetptqwe'n Wayside Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 26, 2013
1. Hnpetptqwe'n Wayside Marker
Inscription. T"nt"nmi, was one of the last Coeur d'Alenes to leave permanent residence along the lake, after tribal members were assigned farm homes under the Allotment Act. At Hnpetptqwe’n, he hosted regular gatherings and celebrations, where guests participated in races toward the lake, on foot or on horseback.

Tribal members, in return for allowing the railroads to be built in their territory, were guests on trains. Many traveled in this manner back to the lake for food gathering, recreation or work. Women were notably present during ice-fishing season. During the winter some Indian farmers loaded their horses onto boxcars and traveled to the landings, where they cut cordwood for the steamboats.

-Felix Aripa, Coeur d’Alene Tribal Elder-
 
Erected by Idaho State Parks & Coeur D'Alene Tribe.
 
Location. 47° 21.893′ N, 116° 48.903′ W. Marker is near Plummer, Idaho, in Benewah County. Marker can be reached from Trail of the Coeur d'Alenes. Touch for map. Marker is located on the Trail of the Coeur d'Alenes, near milepost 5, at the Hnpetptqwe'n Wayside. The trail begins at the trailhead on US Highway 95, just north of Plummer, Idaho. This marker is located 5 miles east along the trail from
Trail of the Coeur d'Alenes (<i>view of milepost 5 from marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 26, 2013
2. Trail of the Coeur d'Alenes (view of milepost 5 from marker)
that trailhead. Marker is in this post office area: Plummer ID 83851, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 1 other marker is within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Heyburn State Park (approx. 2.1 miles away).
 
Also see . . .
1. History of the Trail.
Silver was discovered in the Valley around 1884 and construction of the rail line to support the growing mining and timber industries was started in 1888. Much of the trail today follows this original rail line. When the rail line was built, mine waste rock and tailings containing heavy metals were used for the original rail bed. (Submitted on November 22, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Coeur d'Alene Tribe History.
The name, "Coeur d'Alene" was given to the tribe in the late 18th or early 19th century by French traders and trappers. In French, it means "Heart of the Awl," referring to the sharpness of the trading skills exhibited by tribal members in their dealings with visitors. In the ancient tribal language, members call themselves, "Schitsu'umsh," meaning "The Discovered People" or "Those Who Are Found Here." (Submitted on November 22, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Coeur d'Alene People.
Historically the Coeur d'Alene occupied a territory of 3.5 million acres in present-day northern Idaho, eastern Washington and western Montana.
Plummer Creek (<i>view downhill from marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 26, 2013
3. Plummer Creek (view downhill from marker)
They lived in villages along the Coeur d'Alene, St. Joe, Clark Fork, and Spokane Rivers; as well as sites on the shores of Lake Coeur d'Alene, Lake Pend Oreille, and Hayden Lake. Their native language is Snchitsu'umshtsn, an Interior Salishan language. They are one of the Salish language peoples, which tribes occupy areas of the inland Plateau and the Coastal areas of the Pacific Northwest. (Submitted on November 22, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

4. Trail of the Coeur d'Alenes.
The Trail of the Coeur d'Alenes is a rail trail in the northwest United States, in northern Idaho. It follows the former Union Pacific Railroad right-of-way from Mullan, a mountain mining town near the Montana border, westward to Plummer, a town on the prairie near the Washington border. Generally following the Coeur d'Alene River, the rail line was abandoned in 1991 and the trail officially opened in March 2004. (Submitted on November 22, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Native AmericansRailroads & Streetcars
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 24, 2017. This page originally submitted on November 22, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 42 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 22, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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