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Marshall in Harrison County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Marshall

 
 
Marshall Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 24, 2014
1. Marshall Marker
Inscription. Two years after Harrison County was created by The Republic of Texas Congress in 1839, landowner Peter Whetstone offered property for a courthouse, a church, and a school in an effort to persuade county officials to locate the seat of government in the new town formed on his land. Isaac Van Zandt, the local representative to the Republic Congress, named the new community Marshall in honor of U.S. Chief Justice John Marshall. By 1850 it had become one of the wealthiest towns in East Texas, with a population of about 2,000 and a number of cultural, religious, and civic organizations.

An important Confederate stronghold during the Civil War, Marshall was home to the wartime capital of Missouri and the Postal Headquarters of the Southís Trans-Mississippi Department. Following the war, it was the site of an office of the Freedmenís Bureau.

After the Texas and Pacific Railway located its Division Point, shops, and offices here in the 1870ís, Marshall became a major regional marketing and educational center. Colleges located here included Marshall University, Marshall Masonic Female Institute, Wiley College, Bishop College, and East Texas Baptist College (later East Texas Baptist University).
 
Erected 1964 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 10188.)
 
Location.
Marshall Marker (<i>wide view; former Harrison County Courthouse in background</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 24, 2014
2. Marshall Marker (wide view; former Harrison County Courthouse in background)
32° 32.708′ N, 94° 22.063′ W. Marker is in Marshall, Texas, in Harrison County. Marker is at the intersection of West Houston Street and North Wellington Street, on the left when traveling west on West Houston Street. Touch for map. Marker is located the west side of the Harrison County Historical Museum (former Harrison County Courthouse). Marker is at or near this postal address: 200 West Houston Street, Marshall TX 75670, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Harrison County (here, next to this marker); James Harper Starr (a few steps from this marker); General Elkanah Greer / Knights of the Golden Circle (a few steps from this marker); Governor Edward Clark (a few steps from this marker); Telegraph Park (within shouting distance of this marker); Site of The Capitol Hotel (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Sam Houston's 1857 Campaign in Marshall (approx. 0.2 miles away); Site of Marshall Masonic Female Institute (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Marshall.
 
Also see . . .
1. Marshall, Texas.
At the time Harrison County was created in 1839, its county seat was located at Greensborough on the Sabine River. Marshall was established in early 1841 to serve as the seat of justice for Panola Judicial District. Two years later, as a result of a Supreme Court decision that invalidated
Texas Governor's Community Achievement Award (<i>adjacent to marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 24, 2014
3. Texas Governor's Community Achievement Award (adjacent to marker)
judicial districts and in an effort to influence the commissioners who were choosing a site for the county seat of the newly-constituted Harrison County, Peter Whetstone offered land for a courthouse, a church, and a school. (Submitted on December 2, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. City of Marshall History.
By 1850, Marshall was the fourth largest city in Texas. Marshall played a major role in the Civil War providing munitions and manufactured goods for the Confederacy. Marshall became the Capitol of the Confederacy west of the Mississippi River after the fall of Vicksburg. Marshall also served as the site of the Confederate Government in exile for the State of Missouri from 1863 to 1865. In 1871, Jay Gould established the Texas and Pacific railroad in the area and located its shops in Marshall. From that time until the decline of the railroad industry after World War II, the Texas and Pacific railroad was the largest employer in Marshall and Harrison County. (Submitted on December 2, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. History of Marshall, Texas.
County commissioners were initially concerned that the water in the area would not be good—the reason from moving the county seat from sites on the Sabine River like Pulaski was that they had poor water, were prone to disease, and flooding. Whetstone is alleged to have convinced
Texas Governor's Community Achievement Award 1986 image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 24, 2014
4. Texas Governor's Community Achievement Award 1986
the commissioners that the water was good by pulling a jug of whiskey out from a hollow in an oak tree in what is now downtown Marshall. He passed around the jug, and convinced the commissioners to build on the site; either by convincing them that the whiskey (and water) were good, getting them drunk, or both. (Submitted on December 2, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

4. Marshall Civil War History.
Marshall served many purposes during the war. It was a major center of politics, military operations and supplier of necessities, especially gun powder. The town's Confederate backing, as well as its location on the map, allowed it to serve as a power center west of the Mississippi, ideal for Confederate conferences. At one point, Marshall was the temporary capital of the Missouri Confederate Government that had been forced into exile. (Submitted on December 2, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. EducationIndustry & CommerceRailroads & StreetcarsWar, US Civil
 
Marshall Sesquicentennial Time Capsule (<i>near marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 24, 2014
5. Marshall Sesquicentennial Time Capsule (near marker)
Whetstone Memorial Tablet (<i>mounted on courthouse wall behind marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 24, 2014
6. Whetstone Memorial Tablet (mounted on courthouse wall behind marker)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 4, 2017. This page originally submitted on December 1, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 69 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on December 1, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   5, 6. submitted on December 2, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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