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Center in Shelby County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

C.S.A. Texas Muster

1864 - 1964

 
 
C.S.A. Texas Muster Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 25, 2014
1. C.S.A. Texas Muster Marker
Inscription. Held on this spot April 4, 1964, to honor Texans who made up the greater part of forces fighting in the Civil War Red River Campaign of 1864–1865, that prevented a Federal invasion of Texas.

Descendants answering to roll call for soldiers of 100 years ago included 37 sons and daughters of those fighters. Grandchildren, great-grandchildren and other kinsmen represented such leaders as the Trans-Mississippi Commander, Gen. E. Kirby Smith, and Gens. A.P. Bagby, John R. Baylor, August Buchel, X.B. DeBray, Tom Green, Walter P. Lane, Henry E. McCulloch, Jas. Major, Horace Randal, Wm. R. Scurry, Wm. Steele, John G. Walker, and Thos. Waul; and Cols. Henry Gray, Philip N. Luckett and P.C. Wood.

Friends and descendants of the Valverde Battery restored one century-old gun and brought it from Freestone County to ride in the 8-mile-long parade that moved 36 miles northeastward from here to the Mansfield Battleground. There the cannon shook the earth as it did April 8, 1864, and the assemblage unveiled the first out-of-state marker of the Texas Civil War Centennial, commemorating the Battle of Mansfield.
 
Erected 1965 by State Historical Survey Committee. (Marker Number 7699.)
 
Location. 31° 47.678′ N, 94° 
C.S.A. Texas Muster Marker (<i>wide view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 25, 2014
2. C.S.A. Texas Muster Marker (wide view)
10.875′ W. Marker is in Center, Texas, in Shelby County. Marker is at the intersection of Austin Street and San Augustine Street, on the left when traveling east on Austin Street. Touch for map. Marker is located at the southeast corner of the Shelby County Courthouse Square. Marker is at or near this postal address: 124 Austin Street, Center TX 75935, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 4 other markers are within one mile of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Shelby County (within shouting distance of this marker); Shelby County Courthouse (within shouting distance of this marker); John Joseph Emmett Gibson (within shouting distance of this marker); Poultry Pioneers Plaza (approx. 1.1 miles away).
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker.
 
Also see . . .
1. Twenty-eighth Texas Cavalry Regiment.
In the spring of 1864, Union forces commanded by Gen. Nathaniel P. Banks, supported by a large flotilla of gunboats, began an advance up the Red River with the intention of disrupting the Confederacy's Trans-Mississippi Department, destroying its supply base in Texas, establishing a loyalist state government in Louisiana, and planting the United States flag in Texas to warn the French in Mexico against meddling in the Civil War. The Twenty-eighth Texas Cavalry played a key role in opposing Banks's forces and in the process engaged in the
Texas Muster Marker is located behind this unidentified building on Shelby County Courthouse Square image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 25, 2014
3. Texas Muster Marker is located behind this unidentified building on Shelby County Courthouse Square
only heavy combat that it saw during the war. At the victorious battle of Mansfield on April 8, the regiment had four killed and seventeen wounded. On the following day, at Pleasant Hill, the Twenty-eighth participated in an attack on the Federals who had taken a defensive position and lost nine dead, forty-four wounded, and two missing. Union troops held their position, but Banks soon broke off his campaign and moved down the Red River. (Submitted on December 4, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. April 8, 1964 - The Battle of Mansfield.
Though Taylor was frustrated with the outcome of the day, Mansfield was still a strategic victory for the Confederates. Taylor displayed excellent generalship, maneuvering his force to overwhelm individual parts of the larger Union army. Taylor and his Confederates also captured more pieces of Union army equipment and artillery, and sustained approximately 1,000 casualties. In comparison, the Union army sustained 2,800 casualties and was unable to seize nearly as many Confederate supplies. (Submitted on December 4, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 6, 2017. This page originally submitted on December 4, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 55 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on December 4, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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