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City of Westminster in Greater London County, England, United Kingdom
 

Monument to the Women of World War II

 
 
Monument to the Women of World War II - View from West Side of Whitehall image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, October 13, 2017
1. Monument to the Women of World War II - View from West Side of Whitehall
Inscription.
The Women of World War II

[South Panel:]
This memorial was raised to commemorate the vital work done by over 7 million women during World War II

Funded by the charity Memorial to Women of World War II and supported by National Heritage Memorial Fund

[North Panel:]
Unveiled by Her Majesty the Queen 9th July 2005
 
Erected 2005.
 
Location. 51° 30.213′ N, 0° 7.569′ W. Marker is in City of Westminster, England, in Greater London County. Marker is at the intersection of Whitehall and Downing Street on Whitehall. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 70 Whitehall, City of Westminster, England SW1A 2AS, United Kingdom.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Iraq and Afghanistan Memorial (about 150 meters away, measured in a direct line); Chindit Memorial (about 150 meters away); The Battle of Britain Memorial (about 180 meters away); Turkish Gun (about 210 meters away); The Pelicans of St Jame's Park (about 240 meters away); For His Majesty's Pleasure
Monument to the Women of World War II - South Panel image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, October 13, 2017
2. Monument to the Women of World War II - South Panel
(approx. 0.3 kilometers away); Duck Island Cottage (approx. 0.3 kilometers away); Herman Melville (approx. 0.4 kilometers away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in City of Westminster.
 
Also see . . .
1. Memorial to war women unveiled (BBC News, July 9, 2005). Speaking at the unveiling, Baroness Boothroyd said: "This monument is dedicated to all the women who served our country and the cause of freedom in uniform and on the home front....It is not by its nature purely a military memorial. It depicts the uniforms of women in the forces alongside the working clothes of those who worked in the factories, the hospitals, the emergency services and the farms....I hope that future generations who pass this way down Whitehall will ask themselves what sort of women were they and look at history for the answer." (Submitted on December 4, 2017.) 

2. Monument to the Women of World War II (Wikipedia). The Monument to the Women of World War II is a British national war memorial situated on Whitehall in London, to the north of the Cenotaph. It was sculpted by John W. Mills, unveiled by Queen Elizabeth II and dedicated by Baroness Boothroyd in July 2005....Fundraising was conducted by a charitable
Monument to the Women of World War II - North Panel image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, October 13, 2017
3. Monument to the Women of World War II - North Panel
trust set up for the purpose of establishing a memorial, with the National Heritage Memorial Fund donating towards the project. Baroness Boothroyd also raised money on the game show 'Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?'.
(Submitted on December 4, 2017.) 
 
Categories. War, World IIWomen
 
Monument to the Women of World War II - Looking West Across Whitehall image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, October 13, 2017
4. Monument to the Women of World War II - Looking West Across Whitehall
Description: Bronze cenotaph, around which hang seventeen uniforms representing the different services performed by women during WW2, including Land Army and canteen ladies overalls, Wren uniform, nursing cape, welders helmet, a police overcoat and others. - Imperial War Museums
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 4, 2017. This page originally submitted on December 4, 2017, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 62 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on December 4, 2017, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California.
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