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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Columbia Heights in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Latino Intelligence Center

Cultural Convergence

 

—Columbia Heights Heritage Trail —

 
The Latino Intelligence Center Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, December 29, 2017
1. The Latino Intelligence Center Marker
Inscription.

This block is home to some of the largest Latino organizations in the city, all founded as migration from Central America and the Caribbean increased in the 1970s. Several began with a boost from Cavalry United Methodist Church at 1459 Columbia Road.

Since 1974 the Latin American Youth Center, now at 1419 Columbia Road, has supported youth and their families with education, employment, and social services. LAYC's Art & Media House is around the corner at 3035 15th Street. CentroNia, in the former C&P Telephone building at 1420 Columbia Road, emphasizes early education, and the Central American Resource Center (CARECEN) has offered legal, housing, education, and citizenship assistance since 1981. La Clinica del Pueblo at 2831 15th Street provides affordable medical care. Most neighboring schools and churches offer bilingual or multilingual programs.

Almost 100 years before Latino groups made this their "intelligence center," renowned German immigrant Emile Berliner lived here. Berliner invented a microphone that proved crucial to the Bell telephone's operation. In 1883, he built a large house and laboratory at 1458 Columbia Road, where he also invented the gramophone (record player). With an interest in public health, Berliner founded the Bureau of Health Education and built its headquarters at 1460
The Latino Intelligence Center Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, December 29, 2017
2. The Latino Intelligence Center Marker
Columbia Road (now CARECEN offices).

The Fernwood apartments replaced Berliner's house in 1925. In 2000 Fernwood tenants faced eviction when the DC government condemned the building. Led by six Latinas, all named Maria, residents bought, renovated and created Las Marias Condominiums.

Reverse:
More than 200 years ago, city planner Pierre Charles L’Enfant designed a new capital city on the low coastal plain at the confluence of the Potomac and Anacostia rivers, bordered on the north by a steep hill. Today the hill defines Columbia Heights.

Cultural Convergence: Columbia Heights Heritage Trail takes you on a tour of the lively neighborhood that began as a remote suburb of Washington City. Over time, transportation innovations, starting with streetcars, made Columbia Heights accessible and desirable. Soon, men and women of every background populated the neighborhood, people who changed the world with new technology, revolutionary ideas, literature, laws, and leadership. From the low point of the civil disturbances of 1968, Columbia Heights turned to resident leaders and rose again. Metrorail’s arrival in 1999 provided a boost, reviving the historically important 14th Street commercial corridor. Experience both the new and old Columbia Heights, with all its cultural and economic diversity, as you talk this walk.

A Description
The Latino Intelligence Center Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, December 29, 2017
3. The Latino Intelligence Center Marker
of the Cultural Convergence: Columbia Heights Heritage Trail tour and acknowledgment of its creators follows.

 
Erected 2004 by Cultural Tourism DC. (Marker Number 19 of 19.)
 
Location. 38° 55.646′ N, 77° 1.969′ W. Marker is in Columbia Heights, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is at the intersection of Columbia Road Northwest and 14th Street NW on Columbia Road Northwest. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1400 Columbia Road NW, Washington DC 20009, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Literary Lights (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Main Street (was about 500 feet away but has been reported missing. ); Everyday People (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Wilson Center (approx. 0.2 miles away); Amusement Palace (approx. 0.2 miles away); Drum and Spear Bookstore Site (approx. 0.2 miles away); Turbulence and Change (approx. 0.2 miles away); Fashionable 16th Street (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Columbia Heights.
 
Additional keywords. immigration, inventors
 
Categories. Charity & Public WorkChurches & ReligionHispanic Americans
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 3, 2018. This page originally submitted on December 29, 2017, by Devry Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 72 times since then and 18 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on December 29, 2017, by Devry Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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