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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Darien in McIntosh County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Site of Early Spanish Mission

 
 
Site of Early Spanish Mission Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, August 2008
1. Site of Early Spanish Mission Marker
Inscription. This high bluff was the site of one of the early Spanish Missions of the Old District of Guale. Here, in the late 16th and the 17th centuries, Franciscan friars labored with the Indians, converting them to Chritianity and instructing them in agriculture and other crafts of civilization.

Occupied by a large Indian village before the coming of the Spaniards, this tract was an ideal site for the mission and school activities of the Spanish priests. Archaeological excavations in the area in 1941 and 1953 disclosed evidence of both Indian and Spanish occupation- Indian pottery and bone tools with Spanish olive jars, majolica and iron work, outline of buildings constructed before and after the coming of white men.

Built in the area called by the Spaniards, "Talaje," the mission on this site was part of the chain of missions and visitas by which Spain held title for nearly two centuries to what is now the Coast of Georgia.
 
Erected 1957 by Georgia Historical Commission. (Marker Number 095-10.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Georgia Historical Society/Commission marker series.
 
Location. 31° 21.86′ N, 81° 25.051′ W. Marker is in Darien, Georgia, in McIntosh
Site of Early Spanish Mission Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2008
2. Site of Early Spanish Mission Marker
"Tabby" remains can be seen in the background.
County. Marker can be reached from Ft. King George Drive. Touch for map. At Fort King George State Historic site. Marker is in this post office area: Darien GA 31305, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Savannah Lumber Company (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); To The Soldiers Of Fort King George (about 400 feet away); 200 Years of Sawmilling (about 500 feet away); How Steam Engines Worked (about 500 feet away); Lower Bluff Sawmill (about 500 feet away); Guale Indian Village (about 500 feet away); Old Fort King George (about 600 feet away); Birthplace of John McIntosh Kell (approx. half a mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Darien.
 
Also see . . .
1. The New Georgia Encyclopedia. Spanish Missions; The Spanish chapter of Georgia's earliest colonial history is dominated by the lengthy mission era, extending from 1568 through 1684. (Submitted on September 7, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

2. James A. Ford and the Growth of Americanist Archaeology By Michael John O'Brien, R. Lee Lyman. pages 60-61 Santo Domingo de Talaje ? (Submitted on September 7, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. Churches, Etc.Colonial EraExplorationNotable BuildingsNotable PlacesSettlements & Settlers
 
Site of Early Spanish Mission Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2008
3. Site of Early Spanish Mission Marker
Tabby House c. 1830s
Site of Early Spanish Mission Marker "Tabby" image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, August 27, 2008
4. Site of Early Spanish Mission Marker "Tabby"
Tabby The word tabby is African in origin with an Arabic background and means " a wall made of earth and masonary."

Tabby is a building material for walls, floors and roofs, widely used in coastal Georgia during the colonial period and the early 1800's. It is composed of equal parts of sand, lime, oyster shells and water mixed and poured into forms. The forms were placed around the building and kept apart with spreader pins. After the tabby hardened, the pins were pulledout, and the forms were raised for the next layer of tabby.
Lime made by burning Oyster Shells
Site of Early Spanish Mission Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, August 27, 2008
5. Site of Early Spanish Mission Marker
Spanish Mission (1600-1675) Archaeologists excavating on this bluff found some evidence of a Spanish mission here, possibly Santo Domingo de Talaje, one of the Georgia missions. Artifacts of Spanish origin found here include two olive jars, various sherds of glazed pottery (majolica), a musket buttplate, a sword piece, rosary beads and a coin. ( at the museum)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 7, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 2,823 times since then and 41 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on September 7, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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