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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Oak Ridge in Anderson County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Violent Clashes

“Flying...in the wildest disorder”

 
 
Violent Clashes Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, December 30, 2017
1. Violent Clashes Marker
Inscription. With the threat of war looming, Anderson County residents voted overwhelmingly against secession in 1861. When Confederate forces occupied East Tennessee and established a conscription center at nearby Clinton, Unionists slipped into Kentucky to evade the draft and join the Union army. Many used nearby "Eli's Cabin", built by county resident Eli Ward, as a safe house.

Although fortunate to escape the state's most devastating battles, soldiers clashed at nearby Wallace's Crossroads on July 15, 1862. Union Gen. George W. Morgan wrote of the fight, "On Tuesday noon [Union] Gen. [James G.] Spears, with a party of infantry, attacked 500 of the enemy's cavalry at Wallace's Cross Roads, near Clinton. A citizen reports that at 2 p.m. of that day he net about 300 of the enemy flying toward Knoxville in the wildest disorder; some were on horses, but without coats or arms; others were bare-headed and no arms. It was a complete panic, and they had gone at full run for the distance of 9 miles and were still flying."

As the war progressed, loyalties remained divided. Guerilla violence increased as unionists and Confederate sympathizers clashed. Years of deprivation and violence took a toll on local residents. After the war, the county gradually recovered, aided by the construction of the Knoxville and Ohio Railroad in 1867.

In 1942,

Violent Clashes Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, December 30, 2017
2. Violent Clashes Marker
the Army Corps of Engineers began acquiring land around Oak Ridge for the Manhattan Project to develop the atomic bomb. Many communities that had survived the Civil War, such as Wheat, Scarboro, and Robertsville, were moved or demolished. A small slave cemetery in the Wheat community, (believed to be part of the Gallaher-Stone Plantation) remains nearby and contains 90 marked graves with no inscriptions.
 
Erected by Tennessee Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Tennessee Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 36° 0.746′ N, 84° 15.461′ W. Marker is in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, in Anderson County. Marker is on South Tulane Avenue, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is located in front of the Oak Ridge Public Safety building. Marker is in this post office area: Oak Ridge TN 37830, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Birth of the City of Oak Ridge, Tennessee (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Birth of the City of Oak Ridge, Tennessee (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Birth of the City of Oak Ridge, Tennessee (within
Violent Clashes Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, December 30, 2017
3. Violent Clashes Marker
shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Birth of the City of Oak Ridge, Tennessee (within shouting distance of this marker); Dedicated to the Memory of Those from Oak Ridge Who Gave Their Lives That Freedom Might Live (within shouting distance of this marker); 1944 (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); K-25 – The Gaseous Diffusion Plant (about 400 feet away); Oak Ridge Hospital (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Oak Ridge.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Union Gen. George W. Morgan image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse
4. Union Gen. George W. Morgan
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 2, 2018. This page originally submitted on January 1, 2018, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 54 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on January 1, 2018, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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