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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Celina in Clay County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

History of the Webb Cemetery

1830-1942

 
 
History of the Webb Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Karen Emerson-McPeak, November 14, 2017
1. History of the Webb Cemetery Marker
Inscription. On September 25, 1830, Mary Ann (Hudspeth) Webb (ca 1772-1842) used the proceeds from the sale of her land holdings in North Carolina to buy 200 acres of land in Overton County, located on the east side of the Obed River, about 1 ½ miles upriver from the present Dale Hollow Dam. This area is now submerged under the pool waters of Dale Hollow Lake.

Mary Ann and her three sons, Hudspeth, Giles, and Daniel, made their home along the banks of the Obed River. Upon her death in 1842, her sons buried her in the garden adjacent to her house. The 200 acres were then divided among her three sons. Huspeth received 120 acres, and Giles W. received 80 acres on the southwest corner adjoining the Obed River. Daniel Webb, who was still not married at the time, took cash for this part. Later on August 7, 1845, Daniel bought 100 acres for $600 from his older brother Hudspeth and established the Webb Homeplace.

Daniel Webb Homeplace
Daniel Webb (1802-1864) was the youngest son of Caleb Webb and Mary Ann (Hudspeth) Webb. Daniel was born in Iredell County North Carolina. Daniel married Mary Jane Gammon (1832-1873) on November 11, 1852. Mary Jane was the only daughter of John and Rebecca “Becky” (Whitworth) Gammon.

Daniel and Mary Jane lived at what was first known as the “Old Webb Homeplace.”
History of the Webb Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Karen Emerson-McPeak, November 14, 2017
2. History of the Webb Cemetery Marker
Their first son, William Caleb “Bee” Webb, was born there on January 14, 1855. Their second son, Albert Kitchell Webb, was born in June of 1863.

Daniel’s oldest son, William Caleb “Bee” Webb (1855-1924), married Susan “Suffie” Bow (1858-1913) on February 24, 1876. Suffie was the daughter of Jesse Bow (1827-1870) and Judith (Arms) Bow (1828-1916). They were married for 37 years and had 9 children.

With the construction of Dale Hollow Dam, a number of family cemeteries, including the Webb Cemetery, were relocated out of the future pool waters of Dale Hollow Lake. On November 20, 1942, the War Department, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Ohio River Division issued a contract for cemetery removals. The Webb Cemetery was identified as Tract A-16, Cemetery 27 and was slated for removal to this location within the Donaldson Cemetery. In total, 34 graves location within the Donaldson Cemetery. In total, 34 graves were removed from the Webb Cemetery, which included 7 of Daniel’s slaves and 2 unidentified confederate soldiers who had been killed in a skirmish at the Webb Homeplace.

(Inset top center under house)
Caleb and Suffie’s house stood at the former Webb Homeplace site of his father Daniel. The original slave quarters and kitchen had remained on the property and in later years was converted to storage.

Gray John Webb
The large triangular-shaped headstone and footstone is the grave of Daniel Webb. These two stones were made by Daniel’s most trusted slave, Gray John Webb (1814-1891). Gray John was a man of many talents and served as a handyman, trader, farmer, carpenter, blacksmith, river man, and wagoner.

After the Civil War, the Webb family gave Gray several acres of land which overlooked the Webb Homeplace, and this property became known locally as Gray John Hill.

The Donaldson Cemetery
The Donaldson Cemetery, which was also known as the Donaldson Government Cemetery, was one of eight reinterment sites identified by the U.S.Army Corps of Engineers. Eventually over 2,200 graves were removed from the pool area of Dale Hollow Lake. No doubt, many early pioneers to this region still rest beneath the waters of Dale Hollow Lake.
 
Location. 36° 32.643′ N, 85° 30.232′ W. Marker is in Celina, Tennessee, in Clay County. Marker is on Brown St. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Celina TN 38551, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 11 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Donaldson Cemetery (a few steps from this marker); Celina During the Civil War (approx. half a mile away); Free Hill(s) Community (approx. 1.7 miles away); Dale Hollow Dam (approx. 2.9 miles away); Butler's Landing / Bailey Butler (approx. 4.8 miles away); John Hunt Morgan (approx. 9.9 miles away); Fisk Female Academy (approx. 10.1 miles away); McMillian's Landing (approx. 10˝ miles away in Kentucky). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Celina.
 
More about this marker. Clay County Museum
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial Sites
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 5, 2018. This page originally submitted on January 2, 2018, by Karen Emerson-McPeak of Triune, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 84 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on January 2, 2018, by Karen Emerson-McPeak of Triune, Tennessee. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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