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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
White Hall in Lowndes County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

After the March—Tent City

Selma to Montgomery National Historic Trail

 
 
After the March—Tent City Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, January 6, 2018
1. After the March—Tent City Marker
Inscription. Since the federal registrars came in August of 1965, thousands and thousands of Negroes have registered to vote. White plantation owners have retaliated by mass evictions. In December 1965, over forty families either left the county, moved in with friends and relatives, or took up residence in "Tent City" in Lowndes County, Alabama.
Excerpt from memo written to Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) staff from SNCC Alabama staff members
Stokely Carmichael, Bob Mants, and Tina Harris, February 28, 1966


In December 1965, in the field east of the interpretive center, a small cluster of canvas tents was erected and became known as "Tent City" It was home to some eight families for almost two and one-half years, following the families' eviction from their tenant farms by white landowners. Their transgression? Seeking their right to vote.

Visit the Lowndes Interpretive Center and walk the path that leads to the Tent City site. Tent City represents the aftermath of a battle long fought and won for the voting rights of all Americans. Inside the interpretive center and along the path you can learn of the events that led to the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, brought about by what some call the greatest nonviolent protest of the Civil Rights Movement—the Selma to
After the March—Tent City Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, January 6, 2018
2. After the March—Tent City Marker
Montgomery Voting Rights March.

During the Selma to Montgomery march, Stokely Carmichael (center) and other members of SNCC moved into Lowndes County to help black residents register to vote. At the time of the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 there were only a handful of registered black voters in Lowndes County, even though. blacks composed 85 percent of the county's population.

With the assistance of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), the Lowndes County Christian Movement for Human Rights purchased six and three- quarter acres of land on this site. Families who had no place else to go moved here after being evicted from their tenant homes.

 
Erected 2015 by the National Park Service, Department of the Interior.
 
Location. 32° 16.242′ N, 86° 43.667′ W. Marker is in White Hall, Alabama, in Lowndes County. Marker can be reached from U.S. 80 west of White Hall Road. Touch for map. Located within the National Park Service Lowndes Interpretive Center. Marker is at or near this postal address: 7002 US-80, Hayneville AL 36040, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. It Started in Selma (here, next to this marker); You Gotta Move
The National Park Service Lowndes Interpretive Center. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, January 6, 2018
3. The National Park Service Lowndes Interpretive Center.
(within shouting distance of this marker); Day Two (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Marchers, Supporters, Hecklers (about 400 feet away); A Price Paid (about 500 feet away); No Isolated Incident (about 500 feet away); Holy Ground Battlefield (approx. 0.2 miles away); Mount Gillard Baptist Church (approx. 1.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in White Hall.
 
Regarding After the March—Tent City. Tent City, a settlement on black-owned property near Route 80 in Lowndes County, formed in 1965 for sharecroppers who were kicked off their land for voter registration activity. Tents were set up on the site to accommodate participants of the Selma to Montgomery march. Timothy Mays, a former Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) worker and member of the Black Panthers in Lowndes County, and others worked to make sure Tent City inhabitants got fed. Mays also was instrumental in helping many of them find new housing. Mays became famous to the world on March 7, 1965 in Selma, Alabama. He was among the civil rights marchers who
One of many trail signs marking the route of the march. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, January 6, 2018
4. One of many trail signs marking the route of the march.
set out that day to cross the Edmund Pettus Bridge and were beaten and tear gassed by Alabama State Troopers. News cameras were there when a State Trooper clubbed and knocked down Mays, who was carrying an American flag. Mays didn't drop the flag but held on to as a symbol of the injustice he and others had endured for the cause of freedom. Despite offers to buy the American flag for as much as $50,000, Mays would not sell it for any price. Instead, he promised to donate the flag to the Selma-Montgomery Historic Trail Interpretive Center. The flag and other of Mays memorabilia from the Civil Rights Movement can be seen at the center.
 
Categories. African AmericansCivil Rights
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 7, 2018. This page originally submitted on January 7, 2018, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 73 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on January 7, 2018, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
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