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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
West End in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

During the years following the Civil War

Dupont Circle

 

—Diverse Visions, One Neighborhood —

 
During the years following the Civil War Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, January 13, 2018
1. During the years following the Civil War Marker
Inscription.

Fire Fact, June 25, 1925
The era of horse-drawn fire apparatus ends with a ceremonial "final run" with Barney, Gene and Tom pulling a 1905 Steam Pumper belonging to Engine Company 19.

Fire Department information and images courtesy of Capitol Fire Museum

Fire alarm boxes such as this one (originally painted red) were installed in the District after the Civil War. Telegraphs transmitted the box number (top) to a fire alarm center. This system was used until the 1970s when the boxes were converted to a telephone system. By the 1990s, the callbox system had been replaced by the 911 system and was abandoned.

During the years following the Civil War, because there were no regulations governing the planning of new subdivisions, developers often laid out new streets with no regard for coherence and without public amenities. In 1891 Charles Carroll Glover (below) persuaded Congress to extend the order of L'Enfant's original streets and avenues all the way to the District line.

In 1880 street modernization began to reach this area. That year a recent invention known as asphalt, made of coal tar and gravel laid over a cement base, covered M and N Sts. and the numbered streets south of Dupont Circle while New Hampshire Ave. still had wood block paving, an
During the years following the Civil War Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, January 13, 2018
2. During the years following the Civil War Marker
earlier, failed experiment in street paving (the wood rotted). Gas lamps lighted the paved streets at intersections and at intervals, but only for six hours each night.

Image at left courtesy of The Historical society of Washington, D.C.

Artist, Matthew Parker
Washington artist, Parker, explores multidimensional DC landscapes through photographic collages using a standard point and click camera. Recently adapting Cubism, he wants viewers to experience a scene's poetic space through multiple collaged pictures that wrap around them.

Tour guide, map and artist information for all 22 boxes available at: www.DupontCircleCallBox.com

Reverse:

Dupont Circle
Art on Call


The Dupont Circle Art on Call project explores neighborhood history and local fire and police events. It also celebrates our diverse political, artistic and intellectual community by presenting original artwork by 22 local artists featuring the hub of our neighborhood. Dupont Circle and the beautiful fountains designed by Daniel Chester French.

Art on Call is a program of Cultural Tourism DC with support from
DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities
Office of the Deputy Mayor for Planning and Economic Development
District Department of Transportation

This call
During the years following the Civil War Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, January 13, 2018
3. During the years following the Civil War Marker
box is sponsored by:
Blue Capital Management, Inc. &
Boston Properties, Inc.,
The Dupont Circle Citizens Association


Dupont Circle Art on Call Corporate Sponsor
PNC Bank

This community project also supported by
Dupont Circle Association and the Dupont Circle Conservancy, Inc.
and generous donations from community residents and businesses.

See all 22 Dupont Circle Call Boxes!

Development Committee Members:

Marilyn Newton, Chair
Michael Beidler
Phil Carney
Elaine Faye
Carol Galaty
Bill Glew
Gil Hill
Steve Hoglund
Maureen Lynch
Gary McLeod
Amanda McNally
James H. Mears
Gerald Allen Schwinn

Tour guide, map and artist information available at: www.DupontCircleCallBox.com

Graphic design coursesy of: e-lanestudio
Fabrication: Gelberg Signs

 
Erected by Cultural Tourism DC.
 
Location. 38° 54.428′ N, 77° 3.192′ W. Marker is in West End, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is at the intersection of N Street Northwest and 25th Street NW on N Street Northwest. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1275 25th Street NW, Washington DC 20037, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
During the years following the Civil War Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, January 13, 2018
4. During the years following the Civil War Marker
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Before the 1800s (here, next to this marker); Rose Park Recreation Center (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); Margaret Peters and Roumania Peters Walker (about 700 feet away); First Baptist Church, Georgetown (about 700 feet away); Epiphany Catholic Church (approx. 0.2 miles away); Herring Hill (approx. 0.2 miles away); Washington Before Washington (approx. ¼ mile away); Signing of the Rush-Bagot Agreement (approx. ¼ mile away).
 
Categories. ArchitectureRoads & VehiclesWar, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 17, 2018. This page originally submitted on January 14, 2018, by Devry Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 48 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on January 14, 2018, by Devry Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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