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Fredericksburg, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Fredericksburg City Dock

Bridges and Biscuits

 
 
Fredericksburg City Dock: Bridges and Biscuits Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Bowen, June 5, 2007
1. Fredericksburg City Dock: Bridges and Biscuits Marker
Inscription. Why was Fredericksburg important to the Union war effort? The answer lies in logistics. The Union army, numbering more than 100,000 troops, required tons of food, clothing and other supplies to operate, Wagon trains could supply the army for short distances, but they were cumbersome and difficult to protect. Longer supply lines required either water or rail transportation. Fredericksburg, with its railroad and close proximity to the Potomac River, provided the Union Army with an ideal base for an “On to Richmond” drive.

Three bridges spanned the Rappahannock River here in 1861: the Richmond, Fredericksburg, and Potomac Railroad bridge (which stood at the same location as the modern bridge ahead of you) and two wagon bridges located farther upstream. Retreating Confederates destroyed these spans in April 1862, making it necessary for the Union army to cross the river on pontoon bridges the following December during the Battle of Fredericksburg. The middle pontoon bridge stood here at the city dock.
 
Erected by Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Virginia Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 38° 17.792′ N, 77° 27.22′ W. Marker is in
Ruins of Fredericksburg Railroad Bridge, 1863 image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Bowen, June 4, 2007
2. Ruins of Fredericksburg Railroad Bridge, 1863
Fredericksburg, Virginia. Marker is on Sophia Street south of Frederick Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 101 Sophia Street, Fredericksburg VA 22401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Fredericksburg City Dock (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Fredericksburg City Dock (here, next to this marker); No Outlet (within shouting distance of this marker); The Slave Ship Othello (within shouting distance of this marker); The Middle Passage (within shouting distance of this marker); George Washington’s Boyhood Home at Ferry Farm (within shouting distance of this marker); Fredericksburg's Wharves and Harbor (within shouting distance of this marker); Irish Brigade (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Rocky Lane (about 300 feet away); The Sentry Box (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fredericksburg.
 
Categories. Bridges & ViaductsWar, US Civil
 
Union troops at Fredericksburg image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Bowen, June 4, 2007
3. Union troops at Fredericksburg
Fredericksburg City Dock Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., February 2, 2008
4. Fredericksburg City Dock Marker
Before the Union army constructed pontoon bridges at Fredericksburg in May 1864, wounded Union soldiers had to be carried across the river in rafts like the one shown here.
Fredericksburg City Dock Markers image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Bowen, June 5, 2007
5. Fredericksburg City Dock Markers
Dock on Rappahannock River image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Bowen, June 5, 2007
6. Dock on Rappahannock River
Fredericksburg Railroad Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Bowen, June 5, 2007
7. Fredericksburg Railroad Bridge
Fredericksburg Railroad Bridge and modern freight train image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., February 2, 2008
8. Fredericksburg Railroad Bridge and modern freight train
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 5, 2007, by Dawn Bowen of Fredericksburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,987 times since then and 80 times this year. Last updated on June 10, 2007, by Dawn Bowen of Fredericksburg, Virginia. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on June 5, 2007, by Dawn Bowen of Fredericksburg, Virginia.   4. submitted on February 2, 2008, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.   5, 6, 7. submitted on June 5, 2007, by Dawn Bowen of Fredericksburg, Virginia.   8. submitted on February 2, 2008, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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