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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Cambridge in Dorchester County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Eastern Shore Infantry

Glorious Achievements

 
 
Glorious Achievements Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 20, 2018
1. Glorious Achievements Marker
Inscription. During the Civil War, U.S. Col. James Wallace, commander of the 1st Regiment, Eastern Shore Maryland Volunteers, used this building as his headquarters. The regiment which camped east of here, drew most of its members directly from the Eastern Shore. Wallace’s principle duties were to protect local residents, ensure free elections, stop smuggling of supplies to Confederates and enforce wartime rules and regulations. While most of the men were assigned to the camp at Cambridge, detachments guarded towns, wharves and river ports up and down the Eastern Shore.

When Confederate Robert E. Lee invaded the North in 1863 the regiment marched to Gettysburg where is fought with distinction at Culp’s Hill as part of the U.S. Army’s XII Corps. On July 4, 1863 Wallace reported “The conduct of my men was very satisfactory. All did their duty, and considering that this was the first time they were under fire, their behavior was very steady. … We remained upon the field until 8 p. m., when, in obedience to orders, we took up another position and bivouacked for the night. Thus ended the participation of my command in the glorious achievements of yesterday. From the prisoners taken we have been credibly informed that the enemy we fought was the first Maryland (rebel) Regiment [Battalion].”
 
Erected by
Glorious Achievements Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 20, 2018
2. Glorious Achievements Marker
Maryland Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Maryland Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 38° 34.27′ N, 76° 4.536′ W. Marker is in Cambridge, Maryland, in Dorchester County. Marker is at the intersection of Gay Street and Spring Street, on the left when traveling east on Gay Street. Touch for map. This marker is in front of the Wallace Office Building. Marker is at or near this postal address: 301 Gay Street, Cambridge MD 21613, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. John Barth (a few steps from this marker); John F. Kennedy (within shouting distance of this marker); Finding Freedom (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); This Bell (about 500 feet away); Christ P. E. Church (about 500 feet away); Goldsborough House (about 600 feet away); 1739 (approx. 0.2 miles away); Cambridge House B&B (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Cambridge.
 
Also see . . .  James W. Wallace Office. D-197, Maryland Historical Trust Maryland Inventory of Historic Properties Form. (Submitted on January 21, 2018, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 
 
Categories. Notable BuildingsWar, US Civil
 
Maryland's Tribute to Her Loyal sons image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 20, 2018
3. Maryland's Tribute to Her Loyal sons
Monument at Gettysburg Battlefield to the 1st Regiment, Eastern Shore Maryland Volunteers.(HMdB marker #13974)
Close-up of photo on marker
Thomas Holliday Hicks image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 20, 2018
4. Thomas Holliday Hicks
Thomas Holliday Hicks was born near Cambridge on Sept. 2, 1798, and served as Maryland’s governor from 1858 to 1862. Throughout his term, he was pressured by the General Assembly and Confederate sympathizers to allow Maryland to secede from the Union. Instead, Hicks worked closely with President Lincoln to prevent disruption of supply lines and interference with U.S. Troops.

Hicks is buried less than a mile from here in Cambridge Cemetery. His grave is marked by the monument pictured above, whose inscription states. “This monument, erected by the state in 1868, honors Thomas Holliday Hicks, a native and life resident of Dorchester County. Late in 1860, and early 1861 as Maryland’s first Civil War governor, he opposed the doctrines of secession and coercion. In furtherance of his policy and resisting great pressure, he refused for five months to call the legislature in special session. During the war he supported the Union.”
James W. Wallace Office image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 20, 2018
5. James W. Wallace Office
James W. Wallace Office image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 20, 2018
6. James W. Wallace Office
James W. Wallace built this office on his father's town lot in Cambridge in 1849-50 after graduating from Dickinson College.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 22, 2018. This page originally submitted on January 21, 2018, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 89 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on January 21, 2018, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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