Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Astoria in Clatsop County, Oregon — The American West (Northwest)
 

Pilots on the Columbia River

Ship Safety Requires Knowledge of Local Conditions

 
 
Pilots on the Columbia River Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 8, 2015
1. Pilots on the Columbia River Marker
Inscription.
The mouth of the Columbia River is known to mariners as one of the most hazardous crossings in the world. Large ocean-going vessels rely upon highly skilled pilots to bring them across the bar and then to guide them safely to ports up and down the river.

The channel for large ocean-going vessels on the Columbia River extends to Portland, 100 miles inland from the sea. Bar pilots guide incoming vessels only as far as Astoria, where they are replaced by river pilots for the rest of the voyage. For outbound vessels, this exchange is reversed. From this location, one can often observe the transfer of river and bar pilots from a small pilots' tug.

Getting bar pilots on and off large vessels outside the mouth of the Columbia River is more difficult, due to the rough conditions and high seas which frequent the area. Since the late 1960s, the pilot launches Peacock and Columbia, highly visible with their orange superstructures, have transported bar pilots to and from the entrance to the river.

The first pilot to guide vessels over the Columbia River bar was a Native American appointed by the Hudson's Bay Company. Concomly, a leader of the Chinook people, watched for ships from his village across the river. In 1847, the Territory of Oregon granted its first pilot's license for the
Pilots on the Columbia River Marker (<i>wide view looking north; Columbia River in background</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 8, 2015
2. Pilots on the Columbia River Marker (wide view looking north; Columbia River in background)
Columbia River. In 1850, Capt. George Flavel was granted the first branch license, or commission certifying competency to pilot in these specific waters. Flavel was to go on to dominate pilotage across the Columbia River bar for the next thirty years.

Bar and river pilots on the Columbia are renowned for piloting in some of the most challenging conditions found anywhere in the United States. Vessels and equipment have changed dramatically over the years, but safe passage still depends on skillful guidance by highly trained individuals.

The Columbia River bar is where the largest river entering the Pacific Ocean in the western hemisphere meets the broadest reach of open ocean in the world. When storms and swells off the North Pacific encounter the shallow areas at the river's mouth, enormous seas can result, especially during a hard ebb tide when the water piles up against the rapid outbound current.
 
Erected by City of Astoria.
 
Location. 46° 11.428′ N, 123° 49.736′ W. Marker is in Astoria, Oregon, in Clatsop County. Marker can be reached from East Columbia River Highway (U.S. 30) north of 14th Street, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is located at the north end of the 14th Street
Marker detail: Pilot boarding image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 8, 2015
3. Marker detail: Pilot boarding
Pier, overlooking the Columbia River, in 14th Street Riverview Park. Marker is at or near this postal address: 175 14th Street, Astoria OR 97103, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Columbia River Tugs And Towboats (here, next to this marker); 14th Street Ferry Slip (within shouting distance of this marker); Gimre's Shoe Store (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); At Play on the River (about 500 feet away); Harvesting River & Sea (about 500 feet away); Into the Unknown (about 600 feet away); A Waterfront at Work (about 800 feet away); Fort Astoria (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Astoria.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker.
 
Also see . . .
1. Columbia River Bar Pilots.
The first recorded crossing of the Columbia River Bar by a non-native was by Captain Robert Gray on May 11, 1792. As was the practice of that era, Gray sent the shipís small boat ahead of his vessel to search for the deepest water for safe passage across the shifting shoals and sandbars. (Submitted on January 24, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Columbia River Bar Pilots.
The extensive, dangerous bar channel at the entrance to the Columbia River has a worldwide reputation among seamen as the "graveyard of the
Marker detail: Small Tug <i>Arrow No. 2</i> image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 8, 2015
4. Marker detail: Small Tug Arrow No. 2
The small tug Arrow No. 2 is a familiar sight on the Astoria waterfront as she transports river and bar pilots between ships and shore. The actual transfer must be made while under way to maintain control of the ocean-going vessel.
Pacific." Ever since Capt. Robert Gray entered the river in 1792 on the Boston-registered ship Columbia Rediviva, there has been a pressing need for competent pilotage on the bar. Chief Concomly, of the Chinook people, did make certain that he or one of his emissaries (usually a wife) met inbounders inside the bar and directed them to an anchorage close to his village so he could control the trade with the vessel. In this sense, Concomly can be considered the first river pilot. (Submitted on January 24, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Captain George Flavel.
In December 1852, during a particularly strong gale, the General Warren lost its fore-topmast and sprang a leak, and its engine proved futile against the heavy seas near Astoria. Flavel was unable to rescue the Warren, and forty-two people aboard the ship perished. Nevertheless, his efforts to save the Warren made him a hero to the people of Astoria. (Submitted on January 24, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

4. The Worst Disaster in Oregonís USCG History.
Three rescue boats, including two of the legendary “unsinkable” motor lifeboats, went out to rescue someone — and none of them returned. Five “Coasties” died. And yet it all started as a routine rescue, late in the afternoon on Jan. 12, 1961. (Submitted on January 31, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.)
Marker detail: <i>Peacock</i> daughter boat image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 8, 2015
5. Marker detail: Peacock daughter boat
Winching aboard the motorized daughter boat, used for transferring pilots, onto the stern of the Peacock out beyond the bar. Built in Bremen, Germany, in 1967, the Peacock is designed to withstand the most extreme conditions.
 
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceNotable PlacesWaterways & Vessels
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 6, 2018. This page originally submitted on January 24, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 64 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on January 24, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement