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Gold Beach in Curry County, Oregon — The American West (Northwest)
 

Patterson Bridge

Rogue River Bridge

 
 
Patterson Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 24, 2015
1. Patterson Bridge Marker
Inscription.
Patterson Bridge
(Rogue River Bridge)


Completed January 21, 1932 and dedicated In Memory to the Governor of Oregon Isaac Lee Patterson (1926-died in office 1929)

1932.... The bridge was considered the most advanced concrete bridge in America.

1982.... The bridge was listed as a national engineering landmark by the American Society of Civil Engineers.

1999.... $13 million Grant Authorized for the preservation of this famous bridge. This project will assure that future generations can enjoy this beautiful structure of a bygone era.

The Construction Contract for the Patterson Bridge was awarded to the Mercer Frazer Co. of Eureka, California for $600,000. Construction started in March 1930 and the bridge was opened for traffic approximately 660 days later. The head bridge engineer for the Oregon Highway department was Conde B. McCollough who is remembered in Oregon history for featuring Oregon bridge designs which displayed graceful beauty while maintaining exceptional engineering standards.

The bridge was famous due to the use of a new construction technique developed by French engineer Ernest Freyssinet. The new method used an arch design which was built in two independent segments and separated at the crown. The final
Patterson Bridge Marker (<i>wide view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 24, 2015
2. Patterson Bridge Marker (wide view)
step was to separate the crown using screw jacks and hydraulic jacks and then weld metal rods into the crown space. The crown area was then filled with concrete to create a pre-stressed concrete arch. The Patterson Bridge was the first bridge in the United States to use this new French method.

On May 28, 1932 over 5000 people attended the official dedication party which was commenced when Vice President of the United States Charles Curtis, during the term of President Herbert Hoover pressed a Gold Telegraph key at the White House which signaled Gold Beach to begin the official dedication. What followed was a wild party with Carnival Games, Boat races, live bands, and a massive Salmon Barbecue.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Historic Civil Engineering Landmarks marker series.
 
Location. 42° 25.324′ N, 124° 25.052′ W. Marker is in Gold Beach, Oregon, in Curry County. Marker is on Harbor Way west of Oregon Coast Highway (U.S. 101), on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is mounted on a tall fence which surrounds a fuel tank, near the harbor. Marker is at or near this postal address: 29985 Harbor Way, Gold Beach OR 97444, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 5 other markers are within 10 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Mary D. Hume
NHCEL plaque image. Click for full size.
By Douglass Halvorsen, September 2, 2012
3. NHCEL plaque
National Historic
Civil Engineering Landmark

Rogue River Bridge
Designated 1982


plaque is located next to the NW pier of Patterson Bridge
(a few steps from this marker); Gold Beach (approx. 0.4 miles away); Gold Beach Ranger Station (approx. 1.4 miles away); Cape San Sebastian (approx. 6.1 miles away); Conflict at Pistol River (approx. 9.9 miles away).
 
More about this marker. The marker is a large, painted wooden board in good condition
 
Regarding Patterson Bridge. National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark (1982), National Register of Historic Places (2005)
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker.
 
Also see . . .
1. Rogue River Bridge.
On the Rogue River Bridge, McCullough applied a technique for pre-stressing the arch ribs developed in the early twentieth century by French engineer Eugène Freyssinet. It was an experiment of sorts, completed in cooperation with engineers from the U.S. Bureau of Public Roads, the predecessor of the Federal Highway Administration. The Freyssinet technique employed temporary jacks in the arch ribs during construction to introduce stresses while the concrete cured. This permitted the use of less concrete and steel in the arch ribs, which saved money. More apparent to the motoring public was that the Freyssinet technique
Patterson Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 24, 2015
4. Patterson Bridge
permitted McCullough to design a bridge with slender, even delicate arch ribs that also allowed him to embellish the bridge with Classical designs and scored concrete to give the illusion of cut-stone construction. (Submitted on January 23, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Isaac Lee Patterson Bridge.
The Isaac Lee Patterson Bridge, also known as the Rogue River Bridge and the Isaac Lee Patterson Memorial Bridge, is a concrete arch bridge that spans the Rogue River in Curry County, Oregon. The bridge carries U.S. Route 101 across the river, near the point where the river empties into the Pacific Ocean, and connects the towns of Gold Beach and Wedderburn. A bridge with strong Art Deco influences, the Isaac Lee Patterson Bridge is a prominent example of the designs of the Oregon bridge designer and highway engineer Conde McCullough. (Submitted on January 23, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Rogue River Bridge.
The coastal highway was stitched together during the 1920s and 1930s, the most notable links being a series of bridges across the Wilson, Nehalem, Yaquina, Siuslaw, Umpqua, and Rogue Rivers as well as the Alsea River and Coos Bay estuaries. Most of the bridges were designed by Conde B. McCullough, an acclaimed engineer who was the head of the bridge section of the Oregon Department of Transportation from 1920 to 1935. These were structurally innovative reinforced concrete bridges
Patterson Bridge (<i>wide view; harbor in foreground; Rogue River on other side of breakwater</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 24, 2015
5. Patterson Bridge (wide view; harbor in foreground; Rogue River on other side of breakwater)
that were esthetic landmarks as well as engineering marvels. McCullough himself, as quoted in the Coos Bay Times, once described his proposed series of bridges as “jeweled clasps in a wonderful string of matched pearls,” not just utilitarian traffic ways. (Submitted on January 23, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

4. Conde Balcom McCullough (1887-1946).
During his years with the Oregon State Highway Department, McCullough became one of the leading bridge engineers in the United States. Several of McCullough's striking bridges span rivers, bays, and inlets along the Oregon Coast Highway (U.S. Highway 101). McCullough's work in Oregon - hundreds of structures, including over thirty arched spans - was part of the state's nationally recognized highway system at a time when the automobile first claimed its place in the life and character of America. (Submitted on January 23, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. ArchitectureBridges & ViaductsMan-Made Features
 
Patterson Bridge (<i>south Art Deco bridge piers and railings as seen from highway</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 24, 2015
6. Patterson Bridge (south Art Deco bridge piers and railings as seen from highway)
Patterson Bridge (<i>north Art Deco bridge piers and railings as seen from highway</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 24, 2015
7. Patterson Bridge (north Art Deco bridge piers and railings as seen from highway)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 11, 2018. This page originally submitted on January 23, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 119 times since then. Last updated on January 27, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on January 23, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   3. submitted on January 25, 2018, by Douglass Halvorsen of Klamath Falls, Oregon.   4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on January 23, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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