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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Arch Cape in Clatsop County, Oregon — The American West (Northwest)
 

Cannon Beach

 
 
Cannon Beach Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 8, 2015
1. Cannon Beach Marker
Inscription.
Lt. Neil M. Howison, U.S.N., arrived in the Columbia River 1 July, 1846 on board the 300-ton United States Naval Survey Schooner "Shark" for the purpose of making an investigation of part of the Oregon Country. His report was instrumental in creating public interest in the Oregon Territory and formulating a decision on the location of the boundary between English and American lands.

The "Shark" was wrecked attempting to leave the Columbia on 10 September 1846. In an effort to get the ship off the spit, the three masts were chopped down and the cannon were jettisoned, but she began to break up and the crew took to her boats. Part of her deck, with this small iron cannon, drifted ashore south of Tillamook Head near this location; thus giving the name to Cannon Beach.
 
Erected by Oregon Travel Experience.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Oregon Beaver Boards marker series.
 
Location. 45° 49.221′ N, 123° 57.668′ W. Marker is in Arch Cape, Oregon, in Clatsop County. Marker is on Oregon Coast Highway (U.S. 101) north of Carnahan Road N, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker and Cannon are located in a pull-out on the east side of the highway,
Cannon Beach Marker (<i>wide view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 8, 2015
2. Cannon Beach Marker (wide view)
just north of the Arch Cape Fire Station. Marker is at or near this postal address: 72979 US Highway 101, Arch Cape OR 97102, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. In Harmony with Nature (approx. 5.2 miles away); Roosevelt Elk (approx. 5.2 miles away); Oswald West (approx. 5.2 miles away); Neahkahnie Mountain (approx. 5.2 miles away); a different marker also named Oswald West (approx. 5.2 miles away); Safety and Beauty (approx. 5.3 miles away); From Footpath to Highway (approx. 5.3 miles away); The First People (approx. 5.3 miles away).
 
More about this marker. This is an Oregon History “Beaver Board” marker. It is significantly weathered and somewhat difficult to read.
 
Also see . . .
1. How Cannon Beach Got its Name.
When Captain William Clark and members from the Lewis and Clark expedition visited the area south of Tillamook Head in 1806 to find a whale that had washed ashore, he named the local creek Ecola, the Native American term for whale. Early settlers referred to the area as Elk Creek, but in 1846, a cannon from the shipwrecked USS Shark washed ashore near present day Arch Cape and many began to refer to the area as Cannon Beach. In 1922, the name Cannon Beach was officially adopted as the city's name. (Submitted on January 25, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.)
Arch Cape Carronade (<i>near the marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 8, 2015
3. Arch Cape Carronade (near the marker)
The 1821 Naval carronade and the ship’s capstan which were located on this site have been moved to the Cannon Beach History Center and Museum for safe keeping from continued weathering and vandalism.

The carronade was replaced at this site by an accurate duplicate made from a casting from the original carronade in 1991.
 

2. USS Shark (1821).
The Shark reached the coast of Oregon on 15 July 1846, and crossed the bar off the mouth of the Columbia River for explorations in the lower Columbia River. After several weeks the vessel returned to the mouth of the river on 8 September; and, knowing that the bar had changed position since the last survey was made, spent the following day making new observations of the bar and other preparations for crossing. However, her effort to recross the bar ended in disaster on 10 September, for she struck an uncharted shoal and was swept into the breakers by a swift tide. The ship was a total loss. A court of inquiry absolved Lt. Neil M. Howison of all blame for the loss of his ship. (Submitted on January 25, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Canon Beach History Timeline.
1846 - The USS Shark shipwrecked while crossing the treacherous Columbia River bar. One portion of the shipwreck containing three cannons drifted south and was found washed ashore in the area of present day Arch Cape. Some wood, iron and copper was recovered from the portion of the shipwreck, but the cannons were lost again after being covered with sand.
1898 - A cannon from the shipwrecked USS Shark was rediscovered in Arch Cape Creek. (Submitted on January 25, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.)
<i>Auto Riding at Cannon Beach, Ore.</i> image. Click for full size.
circa 1912
4. Auto Riding at Cannon Beach, Ore.
 

4. Oregon Travel Experience - Cannon Beach. (Submitted on January 30, 2018, by Douglass Halvorsen of Klamath Falls, Oregon.)
 
Categories. Notable PlacesSettlements & SettlersWaterways & Vessels
 
Haystack Rock on Cannon Beach (<i>near the marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 8, 2015
5. Haystack Rock on Cannon Beach (near the marker)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 11, 2018. This page originally submitted on January 25, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 56 times since then. Last updated on January 30, 2018, by Douglass Halvorsen of Klamath Falls, Oregon. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on January 25, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   4. submitted on January 27, 2018.   5. submitted on January 25, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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