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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Hillsdale in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Roads That Divide

An East-of-the-River View

 

—Anacostia Heritage Trail —

 
Roads That Divide Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, February 2, 2018
1. Roads That Divide Marker
Inscription.
In the early evening of November 22, 1963, a clutch of people stood forlornly on this bridge spanning Suitland Parkway. They awaited the procession carrying the body of slain President John F. Kennedy from Andrews Air Force Base to Bethesda Naval Hospital, where it would be prepared for burial. Kennedy had been assassinated earlier that day in Dallas, Texas. The vehicles also carried his widow Jacqueline and newly sworn-in President Lyndon B. Johnson and his wife Lady Bird.

Suitland Parkway had opened in 1944 to connect the new Camp Springs Army Air Base (later Andrews Air Force Base) and the Anacostia Naval Station and Bolling Field (later Joint Base Anacostia-Bolling). It also connected new federal office buildings in Suitland to downtown DC via the Frederick Douglass Memorial Bridge. To build the parkway, however, the U.S. government razed house and separated communities.

A decade later, when the National Capital Planning Commission considered building I-295 to provide commuters a shortcut through east-of-the-river neighborhoods, Anacostians protested that the project would destroy school recreation areas, reduce property values, and harm businesses. Eventually the commission agreed to place the I-295 freeway in Anacostia Park, and construction started in the late 1950s. While the compromise saved
Roads That Divide Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, February 2, 2018
2. Roads That Divide Marker
the neighborhoods, it did not stop the highway from separating them from the riverfront.

The modern Sheridan Station replaced the run-down Sheridan Terrace public housing, built in the later 1950s. Because urban renewal was pushing low-income renters out of neighborhoods across the river, the city rezoned much of Anacostia for affordable apartments to house them. Some of the new units were shoddily built and wore out quickly. By 1975 about 85 percent of Anacostia's housing was rental property. Within a generation this once-rural section had become solidly urban.
 
Erected 2013 by Cultural Tourism DC. (Marker Number 7 of 20.)
 
Location. 38° 51.597′ N, 76° 59.678′ W. Marker is in Hillsdale, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is on Martin Luther King, Jr., Avenue SE north of Stanton Road NW, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2560 Martin Luther King Jr Ave SE, Washington DC 20020, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Barry Farm Dwellings (within shouting distance of this marker); Campbell African Methodist Episcopal Church (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Faith and Action
Roads That Divide Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, February 2, 2018
3. Roads That Divide Marker
(about 500 feet away); Hillsdale (about 600 feet away); Grandpapa's Farm (about 800 feet away); A Navy Town (about 800 feet away); Barry Farm - Hillsdale (was approx. 0.2 miles away but has been reported missing. ); Birney School (approx. 0.2 miles away).
 
Categories. ArchitectureBridges & ViaductsDisastersRoads & Vehicles
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 5, 2018. This page originally submitted on February 2, 2018, by Devry Becker Jones of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 33 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on February 2, 2018, by Devry Becker Jones of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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