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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Georgetown in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

A Drugstore Like No Other

 
 
A Drugstore Like No Other Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, February 2, 2018
1. A Drugstore Like No Other Marker
Inscription. A simple corner drug store was a gathering place for famous Georgetowners in the 1970s. "Doc" Dalinsky's drug store at 1344 Wisonsin Avenue was a popular hangout for many notable Georgetowners, especially when Doc hosted brunch on Sunday — the day his store was closed. According to humorist Art Buchwald, Doc Dalinsky was everybody's druggist and father. "Loveable and surly," Harry 'Doc' Dalinsky was a "character and a card; he created a place for community, a town hall, a locus of sanity and humor presided over by a gentle man with a quick wit."

Often seen in the front room were journalists Ben Breadlee, Art Buchwald, David Brinkley, and Herblock, while other luminaries of the press, judiciary and cinema came and went. In town making All the President's Men, Robert Redford, Jason Robards and Dustin Hoffman hung out there absorbing information on the personalities they would portray. There might be various Kennedys; actresses Lauren Bacall, Gene Tierney and Eva Gabor; and writer Larry McMurtry in attendance. While merriment reigned out front, Doc would often be in the back room dispensing kindly advice on the phone to friends. Doc retired in 1983; the brunches ended earlier, a victim of their own success — too many people.

Georgetown has long attracted writers. Louisa May Alcott nursed Civil War
A Drugstore Like No Other Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, February 2, 2018
2. A Drugstore Like No Other Marker
wounded in a converted tavern at 30th and M Streets and wrote about her experience in Hospital Sketches. Sinclair Lewis wrote Elmer Gantry while living on Q Street. Katherine Anne Porter lived nearby while working on Ship of Fools. Poet and diplomat St.-John Perse, winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1960, lived on 34th Street. Archibald MacLeish, Herman Wouk, Walter Lippman, plus countless historians, political commentators, pundits and sages have lived and worked here.
 
Erected by Cultural Tourism DC.
 
Location. 38° 54.445′ N, 77° 3.805′ W. Marker is in Georgetown, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is at the intersection of Wisconsin Avenue NW and Dumbarton Street NW, on the left when traveling north on Wisconsin Avenue NW. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1326 Wisconsin Ave NW, Washington DC 20007, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Georgetown's Watering Holes (within shouting distance of this marker); Dumbarton United Methodist Church (within shouting distance of this marker); John Lutz (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); St. John's Episcopal Church, Georgetown Parish (about 500 feet away); Colonel Ninian Beall (about 500 feet away); St. John's: 200 Years of History (about 500 feet away); The Cornerstone of the Original Christ Church (about 600 feet away); Historic Preservation in Georgetown (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Georgetown.
 
Categories. Arts, Letters, MusicIndustry & CommercePoliticsWar, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 5, 2018. This page originally submitted on February 2, 2018, by Devry Becker Jones of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 35 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on February 2, 2018, by Devry Becker Jones of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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