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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Cascadia in Linn County, Oregon — The American West (Northwest)
 

Santiam Wagon Road

 
 
Santiam Wagon Road Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 26, 2017
1. Santiam Wagon Road Marker
Inscription. The pass located east of here through the Cascade Range was once called Wiley Pass after Andrew Wiley. Wiley with other Willamette Valley Pioneers explored it in 1859 while searching for a route to move their livestock to the grasslands of central Oregon for summer grazing. In 1864 the Willamette Valley and Cascade Military Wagon Road Company was formed and submitted plans to the U.S. Government for a military road to be built along the route as far east as the mouth of the Malheur River. The land grant of 1966 included 681,512 acres for the road builder. Little road was ever constructed and much of the land reverted to the state in 1868. A wagon road was completed from the valley to near Sisters and became a toll road known as the Santiam Wagon Road.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Oregon Beaver Boards marker series.
 
Location. 44° 24.215′ N, 122° 22.79′ W. Marker is near Cascadia, Oregon, in Linn County. Marker is on Santiam Highway (U.S. 20) near Gorton Road (Santiam Wagon Road) (Forest Road 2032), on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Cascadia OR 97329, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 1 other marker is within walking distance of this marker. America's First Transcontinental Automobile Race
Santiam Wagon Road Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 26, 2017
2. Santiam Wagon Road Marker
(here, next to this marker).
 
More about this marker. Santiam Wagon Road is on the opposite side of South Santiam River from the marker.
 
Also see . . .  Santiam Wagon Road - Oregon Encyclopedia. The Santiam Wagon Road was a vital commercial link connecting the Willamette Valley with central Oregon. Built between 1861 and 1868, the road, which closely followed traditional Indian trails, was in use into the late 1930s and made possible the settlement of central Oregon. (Submitted on February 3, 2018, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 
 
Categories. Roads & Vehicles
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 3, 2018. This page originally submitted on February 3, 2018, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 50 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on February 3, 2018, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.
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