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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Ridgely in Caroline County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Adkins Arboretum-Slavery's Arboretum

Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway

 
 
Adkins Arboretum-Slavery's Arboretum Marker-Side 1 image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, October 29, 2014
1. Adkins Arboretum-Slavery's Arboretum Marker-Side 1
Inscription. The forests and waterways of the Eastern Shore, traditional land of the Choptank and Nanticoke Indians, provided the backup for the austere home life, backbreaking labor, and dramatic escapes of enslaved blacks.

Hundreds of acres of white oak, black walnut, poplar, hickory and sweet gum trees, located near river transportation provided income to local landowners. Harriet Tubman and her father Ben Ross not only graded and harvested timber, but Harriet also learned lessons for living off the land.

Little things, learned by living close to nature, spelled success or failure on the Underground Railroad. Freedom seekers applied their practical knowledge to survive. Fruit trees offered food. Greenbrier thickets ripped clothes and scratched bodies. Spiked sweet gum balls pierced hurried feet, but the tree’s resin soothed painful wounds.

Walk the trails ahead and enter the natural lifeline that helped or hindered the flight to freedom. LEFT: The spiny fruit of sweet gum tree is easy to recognize. A pioneer tree, sweet gum often sprout in areas that have been logged.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway marker series.
 
Location. 38° 57.216′ N, 75° 56.016′ W. Marker
Adkins Arboretum-Slavery's Arboretum Marker-Side 2 image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, October 29, 2014
2. Adkins Arboretum-Slavery's Arboretum Marker-Side 2
is in Ridgely, Maryland, in Caroline County. Marker is on Eveland Road. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 12610 Eveland Road, Ridgely MD 21660, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Frederick Douglass (approx. 2.6 miles away); St. Paul’s Episcopal Church (approx. 2.7 miles away); St. Joseph’s Church (approx. 4˝ miles away); Neck Meeting House Native Garden (approx. 6˝ miles away); Tuckahoe Neck Meeting House-Living Their Beliefs (approx. 6˝ miles away); Neck Meeting House (approx. 6˝ miles away); Maryland Steamboat Company's Joppa Wharf at Denton (approx. 6.8 miles away); Choptank River Heritage Center-Steal Away by River (approx. 6.8 miles away).
 
Categories. Abolition & Underground RRAfrican Americans
 
Adkins Arboretum-Sign at the entrance image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, October 29, 2014
3. Adkins Arboretum-Sign at the entrance
Driving Tour Guide-Adkins Arboretum-Slavery Arboretum image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, November 25, 2014
4. Driving Tour Guide-Adkins Arboretum-Slavery Arboretum
Colored people gathering firewood<br>A winter scene in Virginia<br>[Sketched by W. L. Sheppard] image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 19, 2018
5. Colored people gathering firewood
A winter scene in Virginia
[Sketched by W. L. Sheppard]
Harper's Weekly March 14, 1868, Vol. 12, p. 173
Close-up of image on marker
Alder Cones image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 19, 2018
6. Alder Cones
Alder bark is has been used for various medicinal purposes.
Pine Tree Quilt<br>at Adkin's Arboretum image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 19, 2018
7. Pine Tree Quilt
at Adkin's Arboretum
“In the 19th century, the timbering industry dominated the economic wealth of the Eastern Shore. Slaves like Harriet Tubman and her family worked in the various aspects of the trade. Mills in the area became a source of employment for both slaves and freemen of color. Timber was then transported around the area to support the shipbuilding industry.” - Quilt Trail Pamphlet.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 10, 2018. This page originally submitted on December 3, 2014, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Maryland. This page has been viewed 296 times since then and 55 times this year. Last updated on February 7, 2018, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on December 3, 2014, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Maryland.   5, 6, 7. submitted on February 7, 2018, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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