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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Coos Bay in Coos County, Oregon — The American West (Northwest)
 

Transportation

(left panel)

 
 
Transportation Marker (<i>left panel</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 25, 2015
1. Transportation Marker (left panel)
Inscription.
Most travel was on water;
roads and rail lines were limited in the early days.


Passenger ships called at the Port of Coos Bay regularly. Travel by water was faster, and much more predictable than by land.

In the early 1900s, the steamship Breakwater made the trip from San Francisco to Coos Bay every six days. The ship, carrying freight and as many as ninety-two passengers completed the trip in about thirty hours.

Shipbuilding developed as one of the first industries in the area to meet the needs of water transportation. While most ships were built to transport lumber and coal, other types of ships were built as well.

During both World War I and World War II, employment in the shipyards increased dramatically as local shipyards built ships for the United States government war effort.
 
Location. 43° 22.045′ N, 124° 12.728′ W. Marker is in Coos Bay, Oregon, in Coos County. Marker is on Oregon Coast Highway (U.S. 101) north of Anderson Avenue, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is located in an interpretive kiosk along the Coos Bay Board Walk. This marker is the left panel of a set of three related markers. Marker is in this post office area: Coos Bay OR 97420, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Marker detail: <i>Alliance,</i> <i>M.P. Plants</i> and <i>Breakwater</i> image. Click for full size.
By Victor West, circa 1900
2. Marker detail: Alliance, M.P. Plants and Breakwater
Steamships Alliance, M.P. Plants and Breakwater at the Marshfield waterfront, around 1900.
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Transportation (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Transportation (here, next to this marker); The Changing Waterfront (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named The Changing Waterfront (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named The Changing Waterfront (here, next to this marker); Welcome to the Oregon Coast (within shouting distance of this marker); Shipping (within shouting distance of this marker); Koos No. 2 (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Coos Bay.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Coos Bay Transportation
 
Also see . . .
1. Coos Bay Shipbuilding Company.
Coos Bay lumber mills and the early coal mining industry were dependent on water transportation. The low, rugged Coast Range Mountains obstructed land transportation until a railroad was extended to Coos Bay in 1916. Beginning late 19th Century, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers transformed Coos Bay by building jetties, dredging, and regularly deepening the shipping channel. (Submitted on February 16, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Simpson timber empire made Coos Bay a shipbuilding capital.
There was a time, a century and a half ago, when Coos Bay was the shipbuilding capital of the entire West
Marker detail: Henckdorff’s shipyard image. Click for full size.
By Victor West, 1901
3. Marker detail: Henckdorff’s shipyard
Employees at Emil Henckdorff’s shipyard pose in front of their latest project, 1901.
Coast. It all started, as so much West Coast history does, with the Gold Rush. A young apprentice shipbuilder named Asa Mead Simpson, caught up in the excitement, jumped aboard a sailing ship in which he owned a small percentage and headed for the gold fields. (Submitted on February 16, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Coos Bay’s Ship Builders.
WWI temporarily revived the wooden shipbuilding industry in Coos Bay. The CBSC and the Kruse and Banks Shipyard, established in 1905, each contracted with the government to build ten wooden steamships. CBSC workers were only able to produce four ships before the war ended in 1918, and the government canceled outstanding orders. (Submitted on February 16, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceWar, World IWar, World IIWaterways & Vessels
 
Marker detail: Ship under construction, 1918 image. Click for full size.
By Victor West, 1918
4. Marker detail: Ship under construction, 1918
Laying the hull. Ship under construction, 1918.
Marker detail: U.S. Naval vessel YMS 123 image. Click for full size.
By Victor West, 1942
5. Marker detail: U.S. Naval vessel YMS 123
U.S. Naval vessel YMS 123, launched August, 1942.
Transportation Marker (<i>wide view; this panel on left; adjacent panels to the right</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 25, 2015
6. Transportation Marker (wide view; this panel on left; adjacent panels to the right)
<i>Breakwater - Coos Bay, Ore.</i> image. Click for full size.
Postcard published by Rehfeld's, circa 1910
7. Breakwater - Coos Bay, Ore.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 17, 2018. This page originally submitted on February 16, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 130 times since then. Last updated on February 16, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on February 16, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   7. submitted on February 16, 2018. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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