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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Forest Hills in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

“Music of the Spheres”

 
 
"Music of the Spheres" Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, February 24, 2018
1. "Music of the Spheres" Marker
Inscription.
[Top plaque:]
"Music of the Spheres"

Artist: Martha Jackson Jarvis
Commissioned by Fannie Mae
Dedicated July 10, 2003

[Center plaque:]

Fannie Mae: Van Ness Sculpture Project
Martha Jackson-Jarvis


The design for the Fannie Mae Sculpture Project as a vital sculpture environment that engages visitors as they visually physically experience the mysteries of the dynamic public spaces. My sculpture harnesses the energy and verve of the city through strategic placement of seven orbs entitled Music of the Spheres.

Music of the Spheres consist of seven mosaic spheres that create an imaginative environment and establishes a functional poetic space to be used by a diverse audience.

Historically, Music of the Spheres is a system of ideas and theories about the order of the universe that have traveled through time and cultures, to inform our lives, dating from the Babylonian premise that the cosmos is comprised of seven spheres to Pythagoras, who in 542 B.C. founded the idea that the universe could be explained in musical terms with numbers. Further, Plato describes the celestial music where the paths of the heavenly bodies correspond to a specific musical tone. Later, it evolves into Kepler's
Closeup of Top Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, February 24, 2018
2. Closeup of Top Plaque
harmonies of the world and the birth of modern astrophysics, the mysterious concept of Music of the Spheres has influenced art, science, and the mythology and is best described by the Shakespeare who states... "Such harmony is in mortal souls!"...the sway of these influences still has the power to inform contemporary humanity and provide extraordinary fare for contemplation.

Music of the Spheres is a gift to the community. It functions as a poetic place of pause and contemplation between the cycles of busy urban life. In time, Music of the Spheres will continue to resonate in the hearts and minds of humanity.

[Bottom plaque has the contents of the center plaque in Braille.]
 
Erected by Fannie Mae.
 
Location. 38° 56.678′ N, 77° 3.85′ W. Marker is in Forest Hills, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is on Connecticut Avenue Northwest north of Veazey Terrace NW, on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 4250 Connecticut Avenue NW, Washington DC 20008, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Site of the National Bureau of Standards (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Rock Creek Park (approx. 0.2 miles away);
Closeup of Center Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, February 24, 2018
3. Closeup of Center Plaque
First Atomic Clock, 1948 (approx. 0.2 miles away); Soapstone Valley (approx. mile away); Connecticut Avenue Streetcars (approx. 0.3 miles away); Cultural Institutions (approx. 0.3 miles away); Firehouse (approx. 0.4 miles away); Flora and Fauna of Rock Creek Park (approx. half a mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Forest Hills.
 
Categories. Arts, Letters, MusicEducationScience & Medicine
 
Closeup of Bottom Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, February 24, 2018
4. Closeup of Bottom Plaque
"Music of the Spheres" Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, February 24, 2018
5. "Music of the Spheres" Marker
<i>Music of the Spheres</i> image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, February 24, 2018
6. Music of the Spheres
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 25, 2018. This page originally submitted on February 24, 2018, by Devry Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 76 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on February 24, 2018, by Devry Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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