Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Turkey in Sampson County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Thomas O. Moore

1804-1876

 
 
Thomas O. Moore Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 16, 2017
1. Thomas O. Moore Marker
Inscription.
Governor of Louisiana, 1860-1864; a leader of the secession movement.
His birthplace stood 4½ miles northwest.
 
Erected 1992 by Division of Archives and History. (Marker Number I-40.)
 
Location. 34° 59.54′ N, 78° 11.045′ W. Marker is in Turkey, North Carolina, in Sampson County. Marker is at the intersection of Turkey Highway (State Highway 24) and North Main Street, on the right when traveling west on Turkey Highway. Touch for map. Marker is located north of the railroad tracks. Marker is at or near this postal address: 11 Railroad Street, Turkey NC 28393, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 10 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Duplin Old Courthouse Site (approx. 2.1 miles away); James Kenan (approx. 2.1 miles away); Veteranís Memorial (approx. 2.9 miles away); Henry L. Stevens, Jr. (approx. 5.3 miles away); The War Comes to Warsaw (approx. 5.3 miles away); Richard Clinton (approx. 7.9 miles away); Town of Clinton (approx. 7.9 miles away); Samson L. Faison (approx. 9.1 miles away).
 
Also see . . .
1. Moore, Thomas Overton. Thomas Overton Moore, cotton and sugar planter and governor of Louisiana, was born in Sampson County. In 1842 Moore entered local politics, and in 1848 he
Thomas O. Moore Marker (<i>tall view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 16, 2017
2. Thomas O. Moore Marker (tall view)
became a state senator. In the legislature he supported a bill to establish a "seminary" that evolved into Louisiana State University. It was to him as governor-elect that U.S. Army Major William T. Sherman reported in November 1859, when he arrived to become the seminary's first superintendent. Inaugurated on 23 January 1860, Moore soon faced a crisis as the Civil War approached. He wanted to hold his state in the Union "if any honorable way" could be found, but the course of events led the Louisiana Secession Convention to vote on 25 January 1861 to secede. (Submitted on February 24, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Governor Thomas Overton Moore. During his tenure, a secession convention was assembled, which resulted in the authorization of secession on January 26, 1861. Troops and supplies were organized, banks were instructed to discontinue specie payments, Confederate treasury notes were used for expenditures, and the capital was moved to Opelousas. On June 2, 1862, the federal government appointed George F. Shepley as military governor of Louisiana. Moore continued to govern all but the southernmost part of the state, which was controlled by the Union troops and the Shepley administration. By the end of the war, a warrant for Moore's arrest was issued, but Moore fled the
Thomas O. Moore Marker (<i>wide view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 16, 2017
3. Thomas O. Moore Marker (wide view)
state, traveling first to Mexico and later settling in Havana, Cuba. After obtaining a full pardon by President Andrew Johnson, Moore returned home and worked in restoring his plantation, which had been ruined in the war. (Submitted on February 24, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. PoliticsWar, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 26, 2018. This page originally submitted on February 24, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 71 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on February 24, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement