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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Jensen in Uintah County, Utah — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

A Real Pioneer

 
 
A Real Pioneer Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 17, 2013
1. A Real Pioneer Marker
Inscription.
Old homesteads are scattered throughout Dinosaur National Monument, each a memorial to hope and hard work. This cabin and the nearby structures are part of the homestead established by Josie Bassett Morris in the early 1900s.

Nearing 40 years of age, divorced and with her children grown, Josie wanted a home of her own. She chose this spot for its plentiful water and good pasture, the natural resources necessary to grow fruits and vegetables and raise cattle.

Family and friends from Vernal often visited. The cabin floors were softened by braided rugs, the beds were warmed with handmade quilts, and Josie's favorite pictures hung on wallpapered walls. In summer, beds of cosmos, marigolds, and poppies ringed the cabin.

There was always lots of work and never much money, but life here at Cub Creek suited Josie's independent spirit. She lived in this cabin until shortly before her death in 1964 at age 90.
 
Erected by National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Location. 40° 25.52′ N, 109° 10.498′ W. Marker is near Jensen, Utah, in Uintah County. Marker can be reached from Josie Ranch Road 1.7 miles east of Cub Creek Road (Utah Route 149). Touch for map. Marker
Marker detail: Josie Morris at her gate in 1953 image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 17, 2013
2. Marker detail: Josie Morris at her gate in 1953
and subject homestead can be reached via a short walk from Dinosaur National Monument's Hog Canyon Trailhead. Marker is in this post office area: Jensen UT 84035, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 3 other markers are within 10 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Twentieth Century Homestead (within shouting distance of this marker); A Fremont Mystery (approx. 0.8 miles away); Jensen (Mau-be) Ferry (approx. 9.3 miles away).
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Josie Bassett Morris Homestead
 
Also see . . .
1. Josie Bassett Morris.
Wild and dangerous, romantic and adventurous, the American West is for most people today an almost mythological world, one separated from ours by time, technology, and civilization. Yet, for Josie Bassett Morris, the Wild West was a stark reality. Josie lived most of her 90 years in this austere, yet beautiful, landscape, when people depended on the bounty of the land for survival and "neighbors" for companionship. (Submitted on February 27, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Josie Bassett - Jensen's Remarkable Woman Rancher.
Josie Bassett stands out as one of the most colorful characters in Uintah County's colorful past. She was a unique blend: a sweet, generous, loveable white-haired lady who occasionally rustled cattle, poached deer, and brewed bootleg whiskey
Marker detail: Josie on a horse image. Click for full size.
3. Marker detail: Josie on a horse
For most of her 50 years here, Josie lived alone.
to survive and help family and friends. For 50 years she lived alone in a cabin without plumbing, telephone, or electricity deep within what is now Dinosaur National Monument. Content among her flowers, gardens, orchards, cattle herds, and assorted domestic animals, she became a fascinating minor character in the pageant of the West. A succession of five husbands made Josie notorious. She divorced four--a scandalous process in those days--and was widowed once. That husband died, most likely of acute alcoholism, although some claimed Josie had poisoned him. She was never free from rumors. When lands near Vernal were opened up for homesteading in 1913, Josie decided to make a new life for herself. (Submitted on February 27, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Josie Bassett.
Josie Bassett was born the first of two girls to Herb Bassett and Mary Eliza Chamberlain (Elizabeth) Bassett in Arkansas on January 17, 1874. Josie and Ann were good looking young women, and both had a wild side. By 1893, Ann Bassett was involved romantically with Butch Cassidy, and Josie was involved with Elzy Lay, Cassidy's closest friend. Josie Bassett was reportedly one of only five women who were allowed into the outlaw hideout called "Robbers Roost", located in Utah; the others were her sister Ann, the Sundance Kid's girlfriend Etta Place, Elzy Lay's wife Maude Davis,
Marker detail: Josie using an axe image. Click for full size.
4. Marker detail: Josie using an axe
She did all the work required to maintain a home, including tasks that many people at that time might have called “menís work.”
and Will "News" Carver's girl Laura Bullion. (Submitted on February 27, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Settlements & SettlersWomen
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 27, 2018. This page originally submitted on February 27, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 65 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on February 27, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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