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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Dix Hills in Suffolk County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Long Island Motor Parkway

 
 
Long Island Motor Parkway Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, March 1, 2018
1. Long Island Motor Parkway Marker
Inscription.
First concrete limited
access highway, built by W.
K. Vanderbilt: A. Pardington
engineer 1908 - 1910

 
Erected 1973 by Town of Huntington.
 
Location. 40° 49.005′ N, 73° 17.643′ W. Marker is in Dix Hills, New York, in Suffolk County. Marker is at the intersection of Vanderbilt Parkway and Commack Road, on the right when traveling east on Vanderbilt Parkway. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Melville NY 11747, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Central Long Island (approx. 1.3 miles away); a different marker also named Central Long Island (approx. 1 miles away); Whitman's Hollow (approx. 1.8 miles away); Gold Star Families War Memorial (approx. 3.7 miles away); Women of the Armed Forces Memorial (approx. 3.7 miles away); Persian Gulf and Middle East Wars Memorial (approx. 3.7 miles away); Vietnam War Memorial (approx. 3.7 miles away); Kerry P. Hein Memorial (approx. 3.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Dix Hills.
 
Also see . . .  Long Island Motor Parkway (Wikipedia). "The Long Island Motor Parkway (LIMP), also known as the Vanderbilt
Long Island Motor Parkway Marker - Wide View image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, March 1, 2018
2. Long Island Motor Parkway Marker - Wide View
Parkway and Motor Parkway, was a parkway on Long Island, New York, in the United States. It was the first roadway designed for automobile use only. The road was privately built by William Kissam Vanderbilt II with overpasses and bridges to remove intersections. It opened in 1908 as a toll road and closed in 1938 when it was taken over by the state of New York in lieu of back taxes. Parts of the parkway survive today in sections of other roadways and as a bicycle trail in Queens." (Submitted on March 6, 2018.) 
 
Categories. Roads & Vehicles
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 6, 2018. This page originally submitted on March 6, 2018, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 77 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on March 6, 2018, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California.
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