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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Franklin, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Confederate Monument

 
 
Confederate Monument Franklin image. Click for full size.
By Cynthia L. Clark, August 16, 2017
1. Confederate Monument Franklin
Inscription.
“Love makes memory
eternal.”

To our
Confederate
dead.

 
Erected 1911 by Agnes Lee Chapter, United Daughters of the Confederacy.
 
Location. 36° 40.868′ N, 76° 56.126′ W. Marker is in Franklin, Virginia. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Clay Street (Business U.S. 58) and Meadow Lane, on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Franklin VA 23851, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Franklin Memorial Park (here, next to this marker); Camp Family Homestead (approx. ľ mile away); Pauline Cauthorne Morton (1912-2004) (approx. half a mile away); Franklin (approx. one mile away); Recovery and Progress (approx. one mile away); The Age of Gasoline (approx. one mile away); "Can't Is Not in the Camp's Vocabulary" (approx. one mile away); War Comes to the Blackwater (approx. one mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Franklin.
 
More about this marker. This Confederate Monument, reportedly crafted in Petersburg gray granite, has not always stood in Franklin Memorial Park. Sources say it was originally erected at the center of town
Detail of the Confederate Monumentís front bases. image. Click for full size.
By Cynthia L. Clark, August 16, 2017
2. Detail of the Confederate Monumentís front bases.
in the intersection of 2nd and High streets and has been relocated a couple of times since then.

Another point of interest about this monument as well as the park in which it stands is that both have roots in Southampton County, Virginia. Prior to being incorporated as an independent city in 1961, modern day City of Franklin was the Town of Franklin, a county locality. And this park was donated to the Town in 1946 by the children of Mr. and Mrs. James L. Camp.

As a result of its Southampton County roots, this United Daughters of the Confederacy (UDC) monument has ties to other similar war memorials within the county. In Courtland (formerly known as Jerusalem), beside the Southampton County Courthouse, is a stone bench that the UDC Jerusalem Chapter erected. A Confederate Monument stands at that site also. It, however, was erected by the Sons of Confederate Veterans (SCV), Urquhart-Gillette Chapter in 1902.

See the Related Markers section for more information about Franklin Memorial Park, Franklin, Southampton County, and a few 1861-1865 Civil War events associated with this monument.
 
Also see . . .  Local Confederate Monuments Still Standing (Tidewater News article). (Submitted on March 11, 2018, by Cynthia L. Clark of Suffolk, Virginia.)
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Detail of the Confederate Monumentís rear. image. Click for full size.
By Cynthia L. Clark, August 16, 2017
3. Detail of the Confederate Monumentís rear.
Inscription: 1861. 1865.
Confederate Monument in Franklin Memorial Park. image. Click for full size.
By Cynthia L. Clark, August 16, 2017
4. Confederate Monument in Franklin Memorial Park.
The Franklin Memorial Park Monument is pictured in the background. In the foreground is a small stone tablet-topped monument that was installed in 1976 to mark Franklinís 100th anniversary as a chartered town. Buried beneath is a bicentennial time capsule, dated for opening in 2076.
A view of the monument from behind. image. Click for full size.
By Cynthia L. Clark, August 16, 2017
5. A view of the monument from behind.
Closeup of the statue on Franklinís Confederate Monument. image. Click for full size.
By Cynthia L. Clark, August 16, 2017
6. Closeup of the statue on Franklinís Confederate Monument.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 12, 2018. This page originally submitted on March 11, 2018, by Cynthia L. Clark of Suffolk, Virginia. This page has been viewed 58 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on March 11, 2018, by Cynthia L. Clark of Suffolk, Virginia. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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