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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Seabrook in Rockingham County, New Hampshire — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Shapley Line

 
 
Shapley Line Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 22, 2017
1. Shapley Line Marker
Inscription.
Based on the 1640 southern boundary of Bachiler's farm, it was surveyed by Capt. Nicholas Shapley in 1657, dividing the Province of New Hampshire from the Massachusetts Bay Colony 1689-1741. In 1662 three Quaker women, being banished from the territory, were freed south of here by Constable Walter Barefoot. Edward Gove, imprisoned in the Tower of London for leading the rebellion against Lt. Gov. Cranfield in 1683, lived nearby.
 
Erected 1975 by State of New Hampshire. (Marker Number 103.)
 
Location. 42° 53.823′ N, 70° 52.217′ W. Marker is in Seabrook, New Hampshire, in Rockingham County. Marker is at the intersection of Lafayette Road (U.S. 1) and Rocks Road, on the right when traveling north on Lafayette Road. Touch for map. Marker is located beside the highway, near the intersection. Marker is at or near this postal address: 700 Lafayette Road, Seabrook NH 03874, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Salisbury (approx. 1.6 miles away in Massachusetts); First Public School Marker (approx. 3.3 miles away); Bell of 5th Congregational Church Building (approx. 3.4 miles
Shapley Line Marker (<i>tall view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 22, 2017
2. Shapley Line Marker (tall view)
away); Hampton NH Honor Rolls (approx. 3.4 miles away); Roll of Honor WW II (approx. 3.4 miles away); Rolls of Honor Viet Nam and Korean War (approx. 3.4 miles away); Robert Pike Homestead (approx. 3.9 miles away in Massachusetts); First Meetinghouse (approx. 4 miles away in Massachusetts).
 
More about this marker. The original "Shapley Line" marker is a large granite stone beside this historical marker.
 
Regarding Shapley Line. The Gove Family Burial Ground, a small family cemetery, is directly across the highway from this marker.
 
Also see . . .
1. Town of Seabrook.
In 1638 Massachusetts granted the Town of Hampton. In 1639 Massachusetts granted the Town of Salisbury on the north bank of the Merrimack and far into New Hampshire to the present town of Hampstead. Both colonies assessed taxes for the settlers of Hampton. When these grantees refused to pay double taxes, Massachusetts arrested them and confined them in the dark jail at Salem, in the Bay Colony. Finally the Court appointed a surveyor named Shapley to draw the boundary line between the two towns. Mr. Shapley found a ledge in the middle of the Hampton River which he marked H.B. 1656
Shapley Line Marker (<i>wide view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 22, 2017
3. Shapley Line Marker (wide view)
to designate Hampton Bounds. While another century passed, the tides and the winds filled the bank of the Hampton River with ten feet of sand that buried Bound Rock and moved the bank 300 rods northward. Meanwhile the line between Massachusetts and New Hampshire was fixed at the three mile limit northward of the Merrimack River, and Governor Benning Wentworth granted a new town called Seabrook in 1768, between Salisbury and Hampton. (Submitted on March 25, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Edward Gove and His One-Man Revolution of 1683.
What if you started a revolution and nobody came? New Hampshire’s Edward Gove found out in 1683 – and the answer is you are sent to the Tower of London to await your gruesome execution. Gove was born in London. His father brought him to America around 1647 when he was 17. He gradually moved north from Charlestown, Massachusetts to Salisbury and finally into Hampton in 1665. (Submitted on March 25, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Gove's Rebellion.
Gove's Rebellion was a short uprising in 1683 in the Province of New Hampshire, in which men of the towns of Exeter and Hampton took up arms against the Royal Governor, Edward Cranfield. The rebels were arrested while attempting to muster more rebels. The leader, Edward Gove, was sentenced to death for high treason, and shipped off to London for sentencing. He was pardoned three
Gove Burial Ground, circa 1830 (<i>across highway from marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 22, 2017
4. Gove Burial Ground, circa 1830 (across highway from marker)
years later by James II and returned to New Hampshire. (Submitted on March 25, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

4. A Grandson Remembers Edward Gove.
Edward Gove was a rebel, a person who engaged in armed resistance against an established government, England. He was rebellious and defiant in the Province of New Hampshire in New England at Hampton. That's my grandfather, eleven generations removed, of whom his colonial neighbors said "he was a strenuous man, and frank even to bluntness. When he believed he was wronged he quickly sought to avenge himself, as far as possible, by his own individual efforts. He did not refrain from forceful language and personal assault and was before the quarterly court several times for such offenses." (Submitted on March 25, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Colonial EraSettlements & Settlers
 
Gove Burial Ground, circa 1830 (<i>across highway from marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 22, 2017
5. Gove Burial Ground, circa 1830 (across highway from marker)
Gove Burial Ground, circa 1830 (<i>across highway from marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 22, 2017
6. Gove Burial Ground, circa 1830 (across highway from marker)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 26, 2018. This page originally submitted on March 25, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 44 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on March 25, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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