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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Holly Springs in Marshall County, Mississippi — The American South (East South Central)
 

Rust College

 

—Mississippi Freedom Trail —

 
Rust College Freedom Trail marker (front) image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, April 11, 2018
1. Rust College Freedom Trail marker (front)
Inscription.
Front
In 1960 Rust College students, under the leadership of President E. A. Smith, boycotted the segregated HollyTheater, a protest that in 1962 evolved into a Rust chapter of the NAACP. The chapter offices were installed by Medgar Evers, NAACP field secretary. Members founded a Speakers Bureau, fostering voter education/registration, and in 1962 the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee became active on the campus. In 1963 students were active in the Freedom Vote and later the formation of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party.

Rear
Founded in 1866 under the direction of the Freedom Aid Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church, Rust College sought as part of its mission to educate emancipated slaves. Since that time the college has held to that principle: to give African American students a solid foundation for their futures in business, law, medicine, education, and other mainstream careers.

As the civil rights movement began in earnest during the 1960s, Rust College president E. A. Smith set an example for activism. Students including later activist Willie Peacock, McLemore and other members of the NAACP boycotted the segregated Holly Theater, a protest that in 1962 evolved into an NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People) Youth Chapter
Rust College Freedom Trail marker (rear) image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, April 11, 2018
2. Rust College Freedom Trail marker (rear)
The physical condition of the rear of the marker, including the weathering, has been reported to the State of Mississippi.
at Rust. In ceremonies on March 12, 1962, NAACP field secretary Medgar Evers installed its officers.

In 1962 five Rust College students made a historic visit to the University of Mississippi to hear newscaster Howard K. Smith speak. They were the first black students on the campus since the graduation of James Meredith earlier that year. The students were Raymond Davis, Walter Evans, Leslie Burl McLemore, John Clinton Morris, and William Delano Scott III.

Also in 1962 SNCC (Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee) became active at Rust, as SNCC field secretary Frank Smith, while living on the Rust College campus, recruited students from both Rust and Mississippi Industrial College. Students formed a Speakers Bureau, visiting rural churches and community centers in Holly Springs and its surrounding area to foster voter registration/education during the Freedom Vote campaign. Students active in the Speakers Bureau included Johnnie Harris, Rose Purdy, Tina Evans Scott, and William Scott. Rust College students were active in the MDFP (Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party) protest at the State Capitol in Jackson.

In 1965 and following years, Rust College President Dr. W. A. McMillan, college administrator Johnny Jackson and others began to integrate public restaurants in Holly Springs. Faculty and students integrated local clinics, doctors’ waiting
Closeup of rear side photos. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, April 11, 2018
3. Closeup of rear side photos.
rooms, and the bus terminal.
 
Erected 2014 by the Mississippi Development Authority Tourism Division. (Marker Number 18.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Mississippi Freedom Trail marker series.
 
Location. 34° 46.451′ N, 89° 26.88′ W. Marker is in Holly Springs, Mississippi, in Marshall County. Marker is on Rust Avenue east of North Memphis Street (State Route 7), on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 135 Rust Avenue, Holly Springs MS 38635, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. COFO & Rust College Civil Rights Monument (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Rust College (approx. 0.2 miles away); Hill Country Blues (approx. 0.4 miles away); Holly Springs (approx. 0.4 miles away); Mississippi Central R.R. Campaign (approx. half a mile away); Asbury United Methodist Church (approx. half a mile away); Walthall Home (approx. half a mile away); Yellow Fever House (approx. half a mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Holly Springs.
 
Also see . . .  The Daily Journal - Rust College: A history in civil rights. (Submitted on April 11, 2018, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
Categories. African AmericansCivil RightsEducation
 
View of marker looking towards the McCoy Administration building. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, April 11, 2018
4. View of marker looking towards the McCoy Administration building.
Rust College Freedom Trail marker and a Council of Federated Organizations marker. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, April 11, 2018
5. Rust College Freedom Trail marker and a Council of Federated Organizations marker.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 11, 2018. This page originally submitted on April 11, 2018, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 53 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on April 11, 2018, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
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