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Franconia in Grafton County, New Hampshire — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Preserving a Fragile Formation

 
 
Preserving a Fragile Formation Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 8, 2017
1. Preserving a Fragile Formation Marker
Inscription. Click to hear the inscription.  
As early as 1876, observers had warned that the rocks of the Profile were shifting and slipping, and scientists predicted that one day the formation would collapse. Since then, many specialists and volunteers worked to prolong the lifespan of the state's official emblem.

In the summer of 1958, a major state-sponsored effort to stabilize the Old Man included the addition of four large steel rods and turnbuckles. The largest of those is displayed in the Plaza. It weighs 700 pounds and is 21 feet long. It came down with the collapse of the Old Man in 2003, and was retrieved by helicopter from the rubble beneath the cliff in October, 2010. The only other artifact to be recovered is a smaller end section of a similar rod. That piece is now on display at the Tramway Building.

The remaining end of this rod and parts of three other large rods are still imbedded in the cliff above, and can be seen with binoculars or a telephoto lens.
 
Erected 2011 by New Hampshire Division of Parks and Recreation & Old Man of the Mountain Legacy Fund.
 
Location.
Marker detail: volunteer caretakers image. Click for full size.
By David Nielsen
2. Marker detail: volunteer caretakers
Niels Nielsen and his son David served as volunteer caretakers of the Old Man starting in the 1960s, following a long line of intrepid workers who were dedicated to preserving the Old Man's fragile hold on the mountainside.
44° 9.941′ N, 71° 40.729′ W. Marker is in Franconia, New Hampshire, in Grafton County. Marker can be reached from Tramway Drive west of Styles Bridges Highway (Interstate 93) when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is located at the Old Man in the Mountain Profile Plaza, about a quarter mile walk south from the Old Man in the Mountain Historic Site parking lot, within Franconia Notch State Park. Take exit 34-B from Interstate 93. Marker is in this post office area: Franconia NH 03580, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Viewing the Old Man (here, next to this marker); Why is it called A NOTCH? (a few steps from this marker); The Old Man of the Mountain (a few steps from this marker); A Delicate Balance (a few steps from this marker); Franconia Notch (a few steps from this marker); Profile Lake (within shouting distance of this marker); Landslides (within shouting distance of this marker); Eagle Cliff (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Franconia.
 
Also see . . .
1. Niels Nielsen Doesn't Take New Hampshire's Old Man for Granite. (from August 13, 1984)
A few years back, Niels Nielsen removed seven cubic yards of gravel from the Old Manís ear. This year Nielsen applied a new coat of epoxy to the top of his friendís cranium, re-measured his nasal alignment and checked to make sure his Adamís apple wasnít about to drop off. The
Marker detail: Edward Geddes image. Click for full size.
3. Marker detail: Edward Geddes
In 1916, Edward Geddes pioneered the use of tie rods and turnbuckles to secure the shifting stones that threatened the stability of the Old Man of the Mountain.
aging gent in question is the Old Man of the Mountain, a craggy, stone-faced natural formation on the shoulder of Cannon Mountain in northern New Hampshire. (Submitted on April 18, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Old Man Of The Mountain Collapses. (from May 3, 2003)
New Hampshire awoke Saturday to find its stern granite symbol of independence and stubbornness, the Old Man of the Mountain, had collapsed into indistinguishable rubble. The fall ended nearly a century of efforts to protect the 40-foot-tall landmark from the same natural forces that created it. Only stabilizing cables and epoxy remained Saturday where the famous ledges had clung. (Submitted on April 18, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Old Man in the Mountain Caretaking Photos.
With the collapse of the Old Man of the Mountain on May 3, 2003, New Hampshire lost a beloved icon. Since that day, friends of the Old Man from throughout the Granite State and beyond have continued to celebrate the strength and spirit of the Profile. The Old Man of the Mountain Legacy Fund, with the support of hundreds of people, has created the Profiler Plaza in Franconia Notch as a lasting monument to honor the Old Man. (Submitted on April 18, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. LandmarksParks & Recreational Areas
 
Marker detail: 1958 crack maintenance image. Click for full size.
By State of New Hampshire
4. Marker detail: 1958 crack maintenance
Workers in 1958 covered a large crack with fiberglass mesh and epoxy and secured the rock sections with four large rods and turnbuckles, a piece of which is displayed here.
Marker detail: Old Man remains on May 3, 2003 image. Click for full size.
By Mike Pelchat
5. Marker detail: Old Man remains on May 3, 2003
View of remains of the Old Man of the Mountain showing the rods that held it in place, taken from a helicopter on May 3, 2003.
Preserving a Fragile Formation Marker (<i>wide view; rod & turnbuckle visible behind marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 8, 2017
6. Preserving a Fragile Formation Marker (wide view; rod & turnbuckle visible behind marker)
Rod and turnbuckle described by marker (<i>located beside marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 8, 2017
7. Rod and turnbuckle described by marker (located beside marker)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 19, 2018. This page originally submitted on April 18, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 48 times since then. Last updated on April 18, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on April 18, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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