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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Albany in Albany County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Site of First Poor House in the United States

 
 
Site of First Poor House in the United States Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 12, 2017
1. Site of First Poor House in the United States Marker
Inscription. Click to hear the inscription.  
On this site once stood the first Poor House in the United States.
Community care for the poor was an important feature of Dutch society, and it took root here in Albany as the city was settled in the first half of the 1600s.

Constructed between 1652 and 1656, Beverwijck's poor house was the first in New Netherland to be built expressly for the purpose of helping the poor. It was begun a year before the poor house in Manhattan.

In early Albany, help was available to anyone in need who lived in the village. Residents from all walks of life voluntarily contributed money and alms in the form of food, drink, clothing, shoes, tools, and beaver pelts. Collections were made by the First Dutch Reformed Church and at poor boxes placed throughout the village.

In addition to the poor, this community fund could also support anyone who wanted to get ahead or start a new project but lacked the means. He or she could borrow money at a 10 percent interest rate – making this the first banking system in New Netherland.

The first poor house was built on this site, behind you, at today's 412
Site of First Poor House in the United States Marker (<i>side view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 12, 2017
2. Site of First Poor House in the United States Marker (side view)
Broadway.

The poor house was built on the south side of the Ruttenkill, one of the three major streams that ran through Albany and emptied into the Hudson River. The Ruttenkill was buried in pipes in the 1820s, and today flows under the brick alley behind you.

Note the bench next to the poor house. Albany's Dutch settlers built several bridges over the streams. The bridges were fixed with benches for the practicality and enjoyment of the residents.

These few blocks of Broadway were in the 19th and early 20th centuries part of Albany's newspaper hub.
The poor house was on the site of today's Argus Building, built in the 1830s, once the headquarters of the Albany Argus newspaper and publishing house. Other newspaper offices located close to here included the Albany Evening Journal, Knickerbocker Press, and Times Union.

How do we know?
Since 1974 the New Netherland Research Center has supported the translation and transcription of the 17th-century Dutch Colonial records held by the New York State Library and State Archives here in Albany. These records constitute the world's largest collection of original documentation of the Dutch founders of Albany and New York State.
 
Erected 2016 by Albany Cultural Heritage and Tourism Partnership,
Site of First Poor House in the United States Marker (<i>wide view; marker visible bottom right</i>) image. Click for full size.
3. Site of First Poor House in the United States Marker (wide view; marker visible bottom right)
New York State Museum, Downtown Albany and SUNY.
 
Location. 42° 38.897′ N, 73° 45.043′ W. Marker is in Albany, New York, in Albany County. Marker is at the intersection of Broadway and Beaver Street, on the right when traveling south on Broadway. Touch for map. Marker is a composite plaque, mounted on a waist-high pole, between the sidewalk and the street. Marker is at or near this postal address: 412 Broadway, Albany NY 12207, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Second Albany City Hall (a few steps from this marker); SUNY Plaza (within shouting distance of this marker); Declaration of Independence Centennial Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Henry Hudson (within shouting distance of this marker); Albany - Capital of New York 200 Years (within shouting distance of this marker); 1st Telephone Central Office in New York State (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Fur Trade (about 700 feet away); Lydius Corner (about 800 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Albany.
 
Also see . . .  Beverwijck: A Dutch Village on the American Frontier, 1652–1664.
From the time of its establishment until 1664, when the English conquered New Netherland and changed the name of the settlement to Albany, Beverwijck underwent rapid development as newly wealthy traders, craftsmen, and other workers built
Argus Building, 412 Broadway (<i>view from the marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 12, 2017
4. Argus Building, 412 Broadway (view from the marker)
houses, roads, bridges, and a school, as well as a number of inns. A well-organized system of poor relief also helped less wealthy settlers survive in the harsh colonial conditions. (Submitted on April 22, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Charity & Public WorkColonial EraSettlements & Settlers
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 23, 2018. This page originally submitted on April 22, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 65 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on April 22, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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