Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Edgard in Saint John the Baptist Parish, Louisiana — The American South (West South Central)
 

Allées Gwendolyn Midlo Hall

 
 
Allees Gwendolyn Midlo Hall Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 12, 2018
1. Allees Gwendolyn Midlo Hall Marker
Inscription.
This monument records the names of 107,000 people held in bondage in Louisiana from 1719-1820. The records were gathered from the database Afro-Louisiana History and Genealogy, created by noted historian Gwendolyn Midlo Hall. We have named this monument in her honor for her enormous contribution to the history of slavery in the Americas.

Gwendolyn Midlo Hall graduated from Newcomb College of Tulane University in 1949 and completed her graduate work at Mexico City College and the University of Michigan. She married Harry Haywood, a prominent political activist and scholar, in 1956. Hall taught history for many years, retiring from Rutgers University in 1996. Her academic career includes such seminal works as Africans in Colonial Louisiana and Slavery and African Ethnicities in the Americas. Hall has received numerous honors and awards for her work, including a Guggenheim, National Endowment for the Humanities fellowships, and the John Hope Franklin Prize. Her database Afro-Louisiana History and Genealogy, 1719-1820, which she began creating in 1984, is one of the very first original digital humanities projects.

Whitney
Plantation
- The Story of Slavery –

 
Erected by Whitney Plantation
Allees Gwendolyn Midlo Hall Marker (<i>wide view; marker visible at far left, near gate</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 12, 2018
2. Allees Gwendolyn Midlo Hall Marker (wide view; marker visible at far left, near gate)
.
 
Location. 30° 2.332′ N, 90° 39.085′ W. Marker is in Edgard, Louisiana, in Saint John the Baptist Parish. Marker can be reached from State Highway 18 1½ miles east of State Highway 3213. Touch for map. Marker and associated monument are located within the Whitney Plantation grounds at this address. Marker is at or near this postal address: 5099 Louisiana Highway 18, Edgard LA 70049, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Slave Quarters (within shouting distance of this marker); Golden Grove Plantation (approx. 1.6 miles away); Colonial Sugars Refinery (approx. 1.8 miles away); Gramercy (approx. 2.2 miles away); Lutcher (approx. 2.6 miles away); Lutcher United Methodist Church (approx. 2.9 miles away); Graugnard House (approx. 3.9 miles away); Bourgeois Homeplace / Site Familial des Bourgeois (approx. 5½ miles away).
 
More about this marker. Marker is a metal plaque mounted at eye-level on the wrought iron fence that surrounds the associated monument.
 
Also see . . .
1. Allées Gwendolyn Midlo Hall.
This is the name of the slave memorial dedicated to 107, 000 people enslaved in Louisiana and documented in the “Louisiana Slave Database” built by Gwendolyn Midlo Hall. The latter was born 27 June 1929
Gwendolyn Midlo Hall Monument image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 12, 2018
3. Gwendolyn Midlo Hall Monument
in New Orleans, Louisiana, the daughter of Ethel and Herman Lazard Midlo, a civil rights and labor attorney. Gwendolyn Midlo Hall is also the mentor of many generations of historians of slavery. She is highly regarded for her public outreach and award winning scholarship among historians of Africa, Europe, the United States and the Caribbean. (Submitted on May 12, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Slavery and African Ethnicities in the Americas.
Enslaved peoples were brought to the Americas from many places in Africa, but a large majority came from relatively few ethnic groups. Drawing on a wide range of materials in four languages as well as on her lifetime study of slave groups in the New World, Gwendolyn Midlo Hall explores the persistence of African ethnic identities among the enslaved over four hundred years of the Atlantic slave trade. (Submitted on May 12, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Gwendolyn Midlo Hall.
Gwendolyn Midlo Hall was born Gwendolyn Charmaine Midlo in New Orleans, Louisiana in 1929, in a family of Russian- and Polish-Jewish ancestry. She became active in the civil rights movement at an early age. Between 1947 and 1949 she attended Newcombe College of Tulane University where she completed majors in European and American History. Hall's deep commitment to the civil rights movement was visible when she was arrested in 1949 for violating segregation
Gwendolyn Midlo Hall Monument image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 12, 2018
4. Gwendolyn Midlo Hall Monument
laws. Her family sent her to France from 1949 to 1953 where she learned French and studied classical piano. From 1953 to 1964, Hall worked closely with Harry Haywood (his legal name was Haywood Hall), an African-American leader and member of the American Communist Party, who wrote on topics related to Marxism, particularly as it related to the civil rights movement and the condition of African-Americans in the United States. (Submitted on May 12, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. African AmericansWomen
 
Gwendolyn Midlo Hall Monument image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 12, 2018
5. Gwendolyn Midlo Hall Monument
Gwendolyn Midlo Hall Monument image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 12, 2018
6. Gwendolyn Midlo Hall Monument
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 11, 2018. This page originally submitted on May 12, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 55 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on May 12, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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