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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Staunton, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Augusta County

1738–1988

 
 
Augusta County Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, September 24, 2008
1. Augusta County Marker
Inscription. Established November 1, 1738 by an act of the General Assembly, Augusta County extended from the Blue Ridge Mountains on the east to the Mississippi River on the west and from the southern boundary of the Colony north to “the utmost limits of Virginia” in the vicinity of the Great Lakes.

The County was named for Princess Augusta, wife of Frederick, Prince of Wales, son of George II and father of George III. In 1742 William Beverly, the patentee, deeded this site to the County for its Courthouse. Beverley’s “Mill Place” was renamed Staunton in honor of Lady Staunton, the wife of Governor Gooch.
 
Location. 38° 8.922′ N, 79° 4.317′ W. Marker is in Staunton, Virginia. Marker is at the intersection of East Johnson Street (U.S. 250) and South Augusta Street (Business U.S. 11), on the right when traveling east on East Johnson Street. Touch for map. It is at the courthouse steps. Marker is in this post office area: Staunton VA 24401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Augusta County World War I Memorial Tablet (within shouting distance of this marker); Dr. Alexander Humphreys (within shouting distance of this marker); Dr. William Fleming
Augusta County Monument image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, September 24, 2008
2. Augusta County Monument
(about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); T. J. Collins & Son (about 300 feet away); Augusta National Bank Building (about 400 feet away); Main Passenger Terminal (about 500 feet away); Staunton’s Wharf Historic District History (about 500 feet away); Staunton (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Staunton.
 
More about this marker. Monument consists of a brass tablet set into a large angled block of granite engraved with the a map of Colonial Virginia showing the original limits of Augusta County.
 
Also see . . .  History of Augusta County, Virginia. This 1882 book by John Lewis Payton is considered the standard work on the county. “... and from [the colonial Shire of Augusta’s] ancient territory were subsequently carved the present States of West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, and part of Pennsylvania. ” (Submitted on September 25, 2008, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. Colonial EraPolitical Subdivisions
 
Augusta County Monument On Courthouse Steps image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, September 24, 2008
3. Augusta County Monument On Courthouse Steps
Augusta County Courthouse image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, September 24, 2008
4. Augusta County Courthouse
Lady Justice, Without Her Blindfold, Atop the Augusta County Courthouse image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, September 24, 2008
5. Lady Justice, Without Her Blindfold, Atop the Augusta County Courthouse
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 25, 2008, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 833 times since then and 35 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on September 25, 2008, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.
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