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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Kraków in Kraków Powiat, Małopolska, Poland
 

Józef Chłopicki

 
 
Józef Chłopicki Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, May 22, 2018
1. Józef Chłopicki Marker
Inscription.
W tym domu mieszkał
i umarł 30 września 1854 r.

Józef Chłopicki

Generał Wojsk Polskich
Wódz i dyktator w walce
o niepodległość Polski
w roku 1831

(English translation:)

In this house lived,
and died on September 30, 1854,

Józef Chłopicki

General of the Polish Army
Leader and dictator in the struggle
for Polish independence
in 1831


 
Location. 50° 3.762′ N, 19° 56.25′ E. Marker is in Kraków, Małopolska, in Kraków Powiat. Marker is on Rynek Główny, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: Rynek Główny 38, Kraków, Małopolska 33-332, Poland.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (within shouting distance of this marker); Ignacy Krieger (within shouting distance of this marker); First Evangelical Church (about 90 meters away, measured in a direct line); Church of Sts. John the Baptist and John the Evangelist (about 90 meters away); Honoré de Balzac
Jozef Chłopicki Marker - Wide View image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, May 22, 2018
2. Jozef Chłopicki Marker - Wide View
The marker is visible here on the right side of the orange/yellow building.
(about 150 meters away); Rafał Józef Czerwiakowski (about 180 meters away); Stanisław Wyspiański (about 180 meters away); Feliks Nowowiejski (about 180 meters away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Kraków.
 
Also see . . .  Józef Chłopicki (Wikipedia). "Józef Grzegorz Chłopicki (March 14, 1771 – September 30, 1854) was a Polish general who was involved in fighting in Europe at the time of Napoleon and later...He held aloof at first from the November Uprising of 1830-31, but at the general request of his countrymen accepted the dictatorship on 5 December 1830. However, he saw the hopelessness of the insurrection and quickly resigned on 17 January; then, however, he joined the army as a private soldier and fought in some battles. At Wawer (February 19) and at the Battle of Olszynka Grochowska (February 20) he displayed all his old bravery, but was so seriously wounded at the Battle of Olszynka Grochowska that he had to be conveyed to Kraków, near which city he lived in complete retirement until his death in 1854." (Submitted on June 9, 2018, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California.) 
 
Categories. Wars, Non-US
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 9, 2018. This page originally submitted on June 9, 2018, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 34 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on June 9, 2018, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California.
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