Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Farmville in Prince Edward County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Farmville

Brief Respite

 

—Lee’s Retreat —

 
Farmville Marker on Lee's Retreat image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 26, 2007
1. Farmville Marker on Lee's Retreat
Inscription. Half-starved and exhausted, the vanguard of the Army of Northern Virginia stumbled into Farmville early on the morning of April 7, 1865. Here, at last, the men found long-promised rations – everything from bread to soup and ham. While the head of the army feasted, the rear guard, a few miles east, tried and failed to burn both bridges at High Bridge and keep the Union army south of the Appomattox River. With the Federals approaching, the Confederate supply trains rolled west toward Appomattox Station on the South Side Railroad, frustrating most of the soldiers who went unfed. By 1:30, the Confederates had entrenched north of the river at Cumberland Church, and the Union army occupied the town.

Here in Farmville that evening, Gen. Ulysses S. Grant wrote a letter to Gen. Robert E. Lee suggesting surrender: The results of the last week must convince you of the hopelessness of further resistance on the part of the Army of Northern Virginia in this struggle. I feel that it is so, and regard it as my duty to shift from myself the responsibility of any further effusion of blood by asking of you the surrender of that portion of the C.S. Army known as the Army of Northern Virginia.

Lee, who received the letter at Cumberland Church, showed it to Gen. James Longstreet. He handed it back to Lee and said, ”Not yet.”
Markers in Farmville image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 26, 2007
2. Markers in Farmville
Two Farmville markers are found at this location on Lee's Retreat trail.

 
Erected by Virginia Civil War Trails.
 
Location. 37° 18.366′ N, 78° 23.47′ W. Marker is in Farmville, Virginia, in Prince Edward County. Marker is on North Main Street (Virginia Route 45), on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is at the west end of the parking lot Green Front Furniture on North Main Street. Marker is in this post office area: Farmville VA 23901, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Farmville (here, next to this marker); Site of the Randolph House (approx. 0.2 miles away); Cumberland County / Prince Edward County (approx. 0.2 miles away); Bizarre (approx. 0.2 miles away); Dr. William W. H. Thackston (approx. 0.4 miles away); Main Street - Mayor J. David Crute - EACO Theatre (approx. 0.4 miles away); Beulah AME Church (approx. 0.4 miles away); Confederate Veterans Monument (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Farmville.
 
More about this marker. Portraits of Gen. Robert Lee and Gen. Ulysses Grant appear on the top of the marker. A map showing Confederate and Union troop positions around Farmville in relation to the marker is found on the right of the marker.
 
Also see . . .
Troop Position Map from Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 26, 2007
3. Troop Position Map from Marker
Union troops entered Farmville as Lee’s army crossed to the north side of the river. The Federal 2nd Corps threatened the Confederate movement after successfully crossing at High Bridge.

1. Lee's Retreat to Appomattox. Virginia Civil War Trails. (Submitted on September 27, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. Lee's Retreat. Virginia's Retreat guide. (Submitted on September 27, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 27, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,150 times since then and 42 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on September 27, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
Paid Advertisement