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Abbeville in Abbeville County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Trinity Episcopal Church

Abbeville's Gothic Revival Church

 
 
Trinity Episcopal Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 27, 2008
1. Trinity Episcopal Church Marker
Inscription.
Trinity Episcopal Church is the oldest standing church in Abbeville. With its classic Gothic architecture and 125-foot steeple, it dominates the Abbeville skyline. Built by a congregation made prosperous by the economy of cotton in the antebellum period, it was constructed in 1859-60 as clouds gathered for a war that would radically change their way of life forever.

Marshall Memorial
Memorial to Colonel and Mrs. J. Foster Marshall. Colonel Marshall is one of three lost colonels of the Confederacy buried at Trinity but the only one buried in the churchyard.

Trinity's Architectural Heritage
The congregation engaged Columbia architect George E. Walker to design a new church to replace its 1843 wooden structure. Mr. Walker found his inspiration in the Gothic cathedrals of France. Designed to hold 400 persons, the church was consecrated on November 4, 1860 and still retains many of its original elements. The organ built by John Baker of Charleston dates back to 1860. The bell in the tower is also original and it remarkable because it survived Confederate requests to be melted down into cannon balls. One can still see the original artistic graining on the pews. The boxwood gardens were planed in 1859-1860 by Rev. Benjamin Johnson from the nursery at Pomaria, South Carolina.

Trinity
Trinity Episcopal Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, November 21, 2009
2. Trinity Episcopal Church Marker
Church Today

While a major restoration took place in the mid-1970s, the congregation is committed to the church's care and maintenance as well as the preservation of trinity as a house of worship.
 
Erected by South Carolina Heritage Corridor.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the South Carolina Heritage Corridor, and the South Carolina, Abbeville Historical Sites Tour marker series.
 
Location. 34° 10.617′ N, 82° 22.833′ W. Marker is in Abbeville, South Carolina, in Abbeville County. Marker is at the intersection of North Church Street and Trinity Street, on the left when traveling north on North Church Street. Touch for map. Marker is located just inside the main gate, to the left. Marker is at or near this postal address: 101 North Church Street, Abbeville SC 29620, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Old Livery Stable (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Quay-Wardlaw House (about 400 feet away); Old Bank Building (ca. 1865) (about 500 feet away); Abbeville County Confederate Monument (about 500 feet away); "Big Bob" (about 500 feet away); Abbeville Square
Trinity Episcopal Church Marker -<br>Marshall Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, November 21, 2009
3. Trinity Episcopal Church Marker -
Marshall Memorial
(about 500 feet away); Humane Society Alliance Fountain (1912) (about 600 feet away); Major Thomas Dry Howie (about 600 feet away); The Law Offices of John C. Calhoun (about 600 feet away); Maj. Thomas D. Howie (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Abbeville.
 
Regarding Trinity Episcopal Church. Trinity Episcopal Church was included in the initial application to list the Abbeville Historic District in the National Register of Historic Places. It is also the 34th stop on the Abbeville Historic Sites Tour.
 
Also see . . .
1. Trinity Episcopal Church. Trinity Episcopal Church is an example of Gothic Revival architecture in South Carolina that remains as originally constructed and contains handmade interior woodwork. (Submitted on September 29, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Trinity Episcopal Church. Official church website, includes more photos in its history section. (Submitted on September 29, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. SC ETV Roadshow: Trinity Episcopal Church. Trinity Episcopal Church in Abbeville,
Trinity Episcopal Church Marker -<br>Trinity's Architectural Heritage image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, November 21, 2009
4. Trinity Episcopal Church Marker -
Trinity's Architectural Heritage
South Carolina, was founded in 1842 by Thomas Parker. (Submitted on October 12, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. Organists to conduct sesquicentennial celebration at Trinity Episcopal. Trinity Episcopal Church in Abbeville will begin celebration of the sesquicentennial year of its historic building with an opportunity for the public to enjoy the wonderful acoustics of the church. (Submitted on February 15, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

5. James Townes Robertson. A native of Abbeville, Robertson was born on August 19, 1832. (Submitted on November 22, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Trinity Episcopal Cornerstone Laid
Independent Press
June 24, 1859

The ceremony of laying the cornerstone of the new Episcopal church in our village was performed with becoming solemnity on Monday morning last at 10 o’clock by the Rt. Rev. Thos. F. Davis, D.D., the Bishop of the Diocese in the presence of the attending clergy and quite a number of spectators. Seats had been provided in the pleasant shade of the trees in front of the present edifice…prayers were then offered by the Rev. B. Johnson, and the 100 Psalm of David was then sung to the tune of Old Hundred -- after which followed the addresses of
Trinity Episcopal Church Marker -<br>Trinity Church Today image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, November 21, 2009
5. Trinity Episcopal Church Marker -
Trinity Church Today
the Bishop, and the Rev. Thos. S. Arthur of Greenville…

The plan of the new church was prepared by Mr. G.E. Walker, architect of Columbia. It is a beautiful design in the Gothic style, and has occupied the site of the present edifice. It will be a large and imposing edifice, and will when completed be truly an ornament in our village.
    — Submitted September 29, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

2. Trinity Episcopal Church Dedication
Independent Press
November 9, 1860

The church is a beautiful Gothic structure, and is one of the handsomest edifices in the upper country; reflecting great credit in its design and construction upon the architect, Geo. A. Walker of Columbia, and the contractors, Blease & Baxter of Newberry. The symmetry of its exterior and the convenience of its interior arrangements have been very generally admired. Entering by the ample doorway, a spacious centre aisle and two side aisles, conduct you to well-cushioned seats, and to the rear of the building. On either had are the large Gothic windows of stained glass, through which the “dim religious light” falls in rays of many a fantastic hue; whilst in the rear is the beautiful chancel with its soft carpeted floor, its stuccoed ceiling, and rich stained
Trinity Episcopal Church Marker -<br>Boxwoods Planted 1859-1860 image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, November 21, 2009
6. Trinity Episcopal Church Marker -
Boxwoods Planted 1859-1860
glass window. This window had been admired, and is one of the finest in the state; representing the figure of Christ bearing his cross, and surrounded with many appropriate devices.

An attractive feature of the church is the beautiful marble slab of the communion table, a handsome present to the church from the generous donor, Mr. J.D. Chalmers of the village. Mr. Chalmers has furnished other specimens of his skill in a fine marble baptismal fount and an exquisitely polished tablet, which has been erected to the memory of the late Thomas Parker, the founder of Trinity church.

In a recess to the right of the reading desk has been placed the new organ – a sweet toned instrument from the well known establishment of Mr. John Baker of Charleston. The organist is Prof. Aichel of the Cokesbury Masonic Female College, assisted by a fine choir of young ladies and gentlemen.

The church bell is a present from the Hon. J. Foster Marshall and is a fine specimen of Southern manufacturing skill from the well known foundry of Messrs. John Alexander & Co. of Columbia, S.C.

The interior decorations of the building, the cushions, the curtains, the carpet, etc. have been furnished by the ladies of the congregation…The painting of the interior of the church has been executed by Mr. John Corbett of out village, and for taste and finish the graining and frosting
Trinity Episcopal Church -<br>East (Front) Facade image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 27, 2008
7. Trinity Episcopal Church -
East (Front) Facade
could scarcely be excelled.
    — Submitted September 29, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

3. Trinity Episcopal Church - Abbeville Historic District National Register Nomination Form
Trinity Episcopal Church, 101 North Church Street (1859-60): Monumental, brick church which is stuccoed and scored to resemble stone. The facade is dominated by a multi-level, square tower which contains the double door main entrance set in a multiple archivolt, four-centered arch. The arch is surmounted by a crenelated parapet, above which is a tripartite, lancet window contained within a single, pointed arch surround with applied wooden crockets above. Two single lancet windows pierce the third level of the tower. Corner buttresses rise through the third level to form octagonal spires, between which are stepped, lancet panels on each elevation. A tall, octagonal spire, sheathed in imbricated and sawtooth wooden shingles and terminating in a cross finial, crowns the tower. The side elevations are five bays long, with shouldered and gabled buttresses between bays and at corners. There is a crenelated parapet. The building has a gable roof. The interior displays the wooden, scissors truss roof support system with reinforcing, iron tie-rods. The chancel has a pointed, barrel-vaulted ceiling
Trinity Episcopal Church -<br>Steeple and Spires image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 27, 2008
8. Trinity Episcopal Church -
Steeple and Spires
with ornamental ribs. Original wooden pews remain intact. There are three stained glass windows. A massive pipe organ, built by John Baker of Charleston, South Carolina, in 1860, is still in use. The church was designed by George E. Walker of Columbia, South Carolina, in the Gothic Revival style. The church yard is surrounded by an iron fence and contains a boxwood garden.
    — Submitted November 20, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

4. Trinity Episcopal Church
Compiled by May Baskin Hutchinson,
Trinity Church Historian

Trinity Episcopal Church was founded in 1842. Thomas Parker is considered the founder. The congregation worshiped in the Court House until a small white clapboard building was completed in 1843 on the site of the present building.

In 1858, the members of the vestry, whose names appear on the pews they occupied, felt the growing and affluent congregation needed a larger building. George Walker, a Columbia architect, was chosen and he designed the building in the French Gothic Revival style, which was appropriate as Abbeville was named for Abbeville, France. The total cost, including the organ, was $15,665.00.

The cornerstone was laid in 1859. The walls are solid brick, using brick made on the premises, and covered by
Trinity Episcopal Church -<br>Steeple and Spires image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, January 17, 2009
9. Trinity Episcopal Church -
Steeple and Spires
s cement-like exterior, called "rough cast." This was a common Victorian practice to cover bricks that were porous. All interior woodwork was done by local craftsmen and is grained in the manner of the day. (Graining was a decorative device of the day -- often called faux bois of false wood.) The steeple is 120 feet tall and, in spite of local legend, no one was killed during its erection. The large gold cross atop the spire has long dominated the Abbeville skyline.

On November 4, 1860, not quite three weeks before the fateful Secession meeting was held in Abbeville, the service of consecration was held. On November 22, the Secession meeting was held and the Old South was gone forever.

When the church opened, the organ, a John Baker tracker organ, was in place. Baker ordered the organ parts from England and assembled it in Charleston. This may be the only John Baker organ remaining in use.

We assume that all the windows at the time the church opened were like the one on the south side of the nave, just in front of the balcony. This is stenciled on glass and was a good substitute for colored or stained glass during the mid-nineteenth century. The children's window, next to the new organ was given long-ago by children in the congregation. The diamond-paned windows were given by nineteenth century vestrymen. We have no information about the Tiffany-styled
Trinity Episcopal Church Postcard<br>Sold by the McMurray Drug Company image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott
10. Trinity Episcopal Church Postcard
Sold by the McMurray Drug Company
windows above and beside the entrance doors.

The large chancel window was a gift from a "Greenville Church" and was ordered from England to be in place at the time of the consecration. Unfortunately, the window did not arrive until 1863, having run the blockade in Charleston harbor. It was not the Trinity window ordered for the church and the story is that it was to have been sent to a northern church. Since it was wartime, the window was kept and the wall altered to fit.

The Epiphany window, next to the Baker organ, was given by members of the Lovell and Cheves families and was installed in 1941 when Trinity was closed and services, with the exception of funerals, homecomings, etc., were not held in the church.

The bell in the steeple was given by J. Foster Marshall, an early member of Trinity congregation. During the War Between the States, the Confederate government wanted the bell for war materials, but it was found to be made of unsuitable metal and will peal again when repairs are made to the tower.

At the request of the congregation, only two people are buried in the church garden. J. Foster Marshall and his wife, Elizabeth, both longtime members and long ago benefactors of the church. Marshall was killed in 1862 at the Second Battle of Manassas.

The congregation began to dwindle after World War I and ceased to hold regular services
Trinity Episcopal Church -<br>From the Boxwood Garden image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, November 21, 2009
11. Trinity Episcopal Church -
From the Boxwood Garden
in the early thirties. In the late 1940s, former members, now retired, began to come home to Abbeville and were successful in reopening the church. The first full-time vicar was appointed in 1954, and regular services have continued.

There is a beautiful old cemetery a short distance behind the church. Many veterans of Confederate service are buried here, as well as six Confederate soldiers who died of illness having been taken off the train in Abbeville. There is also one Union soldier buried here.

Directions to the cemetery: Go down Bowie Street past the fourth house to the land leading off to the left. The cemetery will be to your right at the end of the land.

Note: When the original wooden church was taken down, it was stored behind the church. It was later erected in Willington at St. Stephen's. When both it and its successor burned, the tablet to that church's founder was given to Trinity and placed on the wall just in front of the stairs to the gallery. This explains why there are two tablets memorializing "this" church's founder.
    — Submitted October 12, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

5. Jehu Foster Marshall
Born in South Carolina on August 28, 1817, Marshall attended and graduated from South Carolina College
Trinity Episcopal Church Entrance image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 27, 2008
12. Trinity Episcopal Church Entrance
in 1837. He then became a lawyer in Abbeville. A man of "acute intelligence, great tact, of affable and cordial address," Marshall then served a stint with the Palmetto Regiment in the Mexican War. After the War, he married and served in the South Carolina legislature from 1848 to 1862.

Marshall became the lieutenant colonel of the Rifles on July 20, 1861. He rose to the rank of colonel on January 29, 1862. While leading the regiment against a "furious assault", he was mortally wounded in the fighting at Second Manassas on the day after his 45th birthday. He survived but an hour. He had earned the "highest regard of the brigade" and his loss was considered great. Marshall was buried in Abbeville.

Col. Marshall was a figure of some prominence in Abbeville. In the pre-Civil War years, Marshall was a captain in the Mexican-American War, serving in the famed Palmetto Regiment. He donated the steeple that crowns the city's Trinity Episcopal Church. He is one of only two people buried in the church's gardens (the other being his wife). Battery Marshall, on the west end of Sullivan's Island in Charleston, was named for him. He was a lawyer who represented Abbeville as a state senator in Columbia and he was one of the presidents that oversaw the Secession Convention held in Abbeville on Secession Hill, November 22, 1860.

In addition to his South Carolina connections,
Trinity Episcopal Church - West Corner image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, January 17, 2009
13. Trinity Episcopal Church - West Corner
Marshall was owner of a large sugar plantation in Florida. Located in Marion County, near the city of Ocala, this plantation was established in 1855. After Marshall's death, the plantation was run by his widow, Elizabeth Anne DeBrull Marshall, until Union troops under the command of Sergeant Major Henry James burned it on March 10, 1865. The plantation was the last in Florida to provide sugar to the Confederacy. The plantation is now home to the 2.5 mile Marshall Swamp Trail.
    — Submitted November 20, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

6. Armistead Burt (1802-1883)
Armistead Burt, a Representative from South Carolina; born at Clouds Creek, near Edgefield, Edgefield District, S.C., November 13, 1802; moved with his parents to Pendleton, S.C.; completed preparatory studies; studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1823 and practiced in Pendleton; moved to Abbeville, S.C., in 1828 and continued the practice of law; also engaged in agricultural pursuits; member of the South Carolina house of representatives, 1834-1835, and 1838-1841; elected as a Democrat to the Twenty-eighth and to the four succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1843-March 3, 1853); chairman, Committee on Military Affairs (Thirty-first and Thirty-second Congresses); served as Speaker pro tempore of the House
Trinity Episcopal Church - South Corner image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 10, 2010
14. Trinity Episcopal Church - South Corner
of Representatives during the absence of Speaker Winthrop in 1848; was not a candidate for renomination in 1852; resumed the practice of law in Abbeville; delegate to the Democratic National Convention in 1868; died in Abbeville, S.C., October 30, 1883; interment in Episcopal Cemetery. (Source: Biographical Directory of the U.S. Congress.)
    — Submitted November 22, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

7. Colonel James Townes Robertson
Colonel James Townes Robertson, born in Abbeville county, S. C., August 19, 1832, is the son of Captain Francis P. and Elizabeth (Holleman) Robertson. He was reared in Abbeville county, in which his entire life, except during the war period, has been spent, his chief pursuit having been that of a merchant, though of late his attention has been given to farming. At the beginning of hostilities, in January, 1861, he volunteered and went to Charleston, as a private in Company D, First South Carolina volunteers, and was therefore one of the very first to volunteer in his State. He enlisted for six months or until Fort Sumter was taken or surrendered. He was stationed with his company on Morris island during the bombardment of Fort Sumter and saw the first shot fired at the fort, upon the surrender of which his company and regiment disbanded.
Trinity Episcopal Church Exterior Wall image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 27, 2008
15. Trinity Episcopal Church Exterior Wall
He returned home and shortly after helped to organize Company B, Orr's regiment of rifles, and was elected third lieutenant. He was immediately promoted to second lieutenant, and at the battle of Second Manassas was promoted to captain of his company, and was subsequently promoted to major of his regiment, after having once before declined to accept the office, over a warm friend of his. His friend, however, was killed in the battle of Fussell's Mill, whereupon he accepted the promotion. A few months later he was promoted to lieutenant-colonel of his regiment and was leading it when surrendered at Appomattox, the colonel having been captured a few days before. He was in every battle, skirmish and march, in which Orr's regiment of rifles was engaged during the entire war. He was wounded at Fredericksburg, through the left wrist, and in all participated in about one hundred battles and skirmishes. Since 1872 Colonel Robertson has resided in Abbeville, where he has one of the most beautiful homes to be found in South Carolina. He is a member of Secession camp, U.C.V., and has served two years in the State legislature. He was married in 1872 to Miss Eugenia Miller, who died in 1894, leaving five children, three daughters and two sons. (Source: Confederate Military History by Ellison Capers, pg 818.)
    — Submitted November
Trinity Episcopal Church Cornerstone image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 27, 2008
16. Trinity Episcopal Church Cornerstone
Trinity Episcopal
Church
Parish Organized
-- 1842 --
Present Church
Built - 1859
22, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

8. Octavius Theodore Porcher as a Teacher by Robert Means Davis (The Educational, 1903)
His method of instruction will interest teachers in the present day. Mr. Porcher's motto was thoroughness. In arithmetic he drilled the boys, especially in fractions, requiring the reasons for every operation until all but the dullards had facility in mechanical operation at least...

When our class began algebra, Mr. Porcher explained the subject for about a week and then said, "Boys, I expect every tub to stand on its own bottom. You must receive no assistance from anyone." This was a severe rule but it was scrupulously obeyed.
    — Submitted November 21, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

9. Haskell Family Marker
The five-foot high marble tablet wad erected at some point after Alexander's death in 1910. Langdon C. Haskell was a captain on the staff of Major General Richard H. Anderson at war's end. Charles T. Haskell, Jr., was captain of the Calhoun Light Infantry, Company D, First South Carolina Infantry (Regulars). He was killed during the Federal assault on the south end of Morris Island on July 10, 1863, and is buried at Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston. William
Rev. Octavius Theodore Porcher image. Click for more information.
By Brian Scott, May 2, 2009
17. Rev. Octavius Theodore Porcher
Sacred to the Memory of
Rev. Octavius Theodore Porcher
The Founder and First Rector
of this Church,
Born June 9, 1829 Died Dec. 30, 1873
A man who, above most men of his
Time, walked with God by Faith,
was sustained by a living and
Holy Hope, and exercised towards
his fellow men, without respect
Of persons,
An active and self denying Charity.
This tablet is erected in grateful and
affectionate remembrance of his
character and services,
by
his former pupils and
the members of this church.

-----
Rector of Saint Paul's Episcopal
Church, Bennettsville, for 22 years.
Buried in McCall Cemetery, Bennettsville.

Click for more information.
T. Haskell was captain of Haskell's Rifle Corps, Company H, First (Gregg's) S.C. Volunteer Regiment. He commanded the Battalion of Sharpshooters in Maxcy Gregg's Brigade and was killed leading the battalion at Gettysburg on July 23, 1863.

Alexander C. Haskell held the rank of lieutenant as adjutant in Gregg's First S.C. Volunteer Regiment until the creation of the 7th S.C. Cavalry Regiment in March 1864, when he was appointed lieutenant colonel. In May 1864, he was appointed colonel of the 7th Regiment. He was severely wounded on the Darbytown Road on October 7, 1864, and lost his left eye. He was active in state politics after the war, playing a prominent part in the Red Shirt Campaign of 1876. John C. Haskell was a lieutenant in the First S.C. Artillery Regiment. He had advanced to lieutenant colonel by the end of the war, having served as a staff officer and a battalion commander. John Haskell was considered one of the finest artillerymen in the Army of Northern Virginia. He lost an arm at the battle of Gaines' Mill and was one of the four one-armed veterans who escorted four young ladies as they unveiled the monument on the statehouse grounds in Columbia in 1879. Joseph C. Haskell became a captain and assistant adjutant general on the staff of Brigadier General E.P. Alexander. Louis W. Haskell was still at home when the war ended. Hayne C. Haskell lived only two weeks
Haskell Family Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 10, 2010
18. Haskell Family Plaque
In Memory of
Charles Thomson Haskell
1802 - 1875
Sophia Lowell His Wife
1809 - 1881
Their Children
Langdon Cheves Haskell
b. 1831, d. 1882
Capt. & Adjt. Gen. 3rd Army Corps, A.N.Va.

Mary Elizabeth Haskell
b. 1833, d. 1855
Charles Thomson Haskell
b. 1835, d. 1863
Capt. 1st S.C. Artillery Regulars

William Thomson Haskell
b. 1837, d. 1863
Capt. of Infantry A.N.Va.

Alexander Cheves Haskell
b. 1839, d. 1910
Col. of Cavalry A.N.Va.

John Cheves Haskell
b. 1841, d. 1909
Col. of Artillery A.N.Va.

Joseph Cheves Haskell
b. 1843
Capt. & Asst. Adjt. Gen. 1st Artillery Corps A.N.Va

Sophia Lovell, wife of Langdon Cheves
b. 1849
Louis Wardlaw Haskell
b. 1848
Private of Cavalry A.N.Va.

Paul Thomson Haskell
b. 1850
Hayne Cheves Haskell
b. & d. 1852
after he was born. A sister, Charlotte Thomson Haskell, was born between 1835 and 1838, but lived only a few days. (Source: A Guide to Confederate Monuments in South Carolina" Passing the Silent Cup" by Robert S. Seigler (1997) pgs 32-31).
    — Submitted November 21, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

10. Obituary of William Campbell "Willie" McGowan
Laurensville Herald
March 4, 1898

Capt. William C. McGowan died at his home at Abbeville, on the 27th ult. The deceased was a young man of brilliant intellect and bright promise of future usefulness and distinction. He was the only son of the late Judge Samuel McGowan. Perhaps no young man had more warm admirers and strong personal friends than did Willie McGowan.

The proceedings of Court were brought to a sudden termination at noon on Thursday of last week by the receipt of a telegram to Judge Benet, conveying the sad intelligence that his brother-in-law, Capt. W.C. McGowan, was extremely ill, and not expected to live more than a few hours. A recess was ordered and the Judge left for Abbeville. He returned Monday last, Capt. McGowan having died the evening previous, ordering an extra term to begin on April 19th.
    — Submitted November
William Campbell McGowan image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, November 21, 2009
19. William Campbell McGowan
In Memory of
William Campbell
McGowan

Born 16 March, 1858.
Died 27 February, 1898.

Near the Choir
In Which He Sang so Long
His Sisters Place this Tablet.

I Will Sing a New Song
Unto Thee, O God
22, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

11. John Alfred Calhoun Descendants (from Notable Southern Families, Vol. I)
John Alfred Calhoun married Sarah Morvin Norwood and had:

  • James Caldwell Calhoun, Sr., who married Blandina M. Kirtland, and had: 1) Isaac Kurtland Calhoun, 2) James Caldwell Calhoun, Jr.; 3) John Alfred Calhoun II, who married Mat North Colcock; 4) Lucy Calhoun; 5) Tredwell Ayers Calhoun

  • Mary Norwood Calhoun, who married General William Lomax

  • Aurelia Calhoun, who married Alexander R. Rucker

  • Sarah Martin Calhoun, who married Andrew Simonds, son of Jane Hamilton Calhoun and Dr. Joseph Webb Simonds

  • Williamson Norwood Calhoun, who married Virginia Caroline Bowman, daughter of Rev. Peyton Green Bowman and had: 1) Sarah Norwood Calhoun; 2) James Caldwell Calhoun; 3) Marie Bowman Calhoun, who married R.H. Baker; 4) Virginia Calhoun

  • Caroline Calhoun Calhoun, who married George Erskine Heard

  • John Alfred Calhoun, who died unmarried

  • Orville Tatum Calhoun, who married Sallie P. Gilbert and had Gilbert Calhoun

  • Anna Susan Calhoun, who married William A. Ancrum

  • William Patrick Calhoun, who married Gladys Boykin

  • Tennent Lomax Calhoun

  • Kate Calhoun, who married
    William Campbell McGowan<br>March 16 , 1858 - February 27, 1898 image. Click for full size.
    Abbeville County by the Abbeville County Historical Society
    20. William Campbell McGowan
    March 16 , 1858 - February 27, 1898
    Alonzo H. O'Farrell
        — Submitted November 21, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

     
    Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesChurches, Etc.
     
    Thomas Walter Thomas Memorial image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, November 21, 2009
    21. Thomas Walter Thomas Memorial
    In Memoriam
    Thomas Walter Thomas
    1798 --- 1855
    Who Served on the First Vestry of
    Trinity Church in 1842
    and His Wife
    Elizabeth Hamilton Kirk Thomas
    1811 --- 1868
    Devoted Member of Trinity Church
    Calhoun Family Plaque image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, September 10, 2010
    22. Calhoun Family Plaque
    In Loving Memory of
    John Alfred Calhoun
    Born January 8th 1807
    Died August 25th 1874
    and his wife
    Sarah Mornin Norwood
    Born May 18th 1814
    Died December 3rd 1891
    -----
    A signer of the South Carolina
    Ordinance of Secession
    December 20, 1860.
    John Alfred Calhoun<br>January 8th 1807 - August 25th 1874 image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott
    23. John Alfred Calhoun
    January 8th 1807 - August 25th 1874
    A son of James Calhoun (older brother to the famous John Caldwell Calhoun) and grandson of pioneer settler Patrick Calhoun, John Alfred Calhoun was a signer of the S.C. Ordinance of Secession and is buried in the church's cemetery.
    Edwin & Eugenia Parker image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, November 21, 2009
    24. Edwin & Eugenia Parker
    In Memory of
    Edwin Parker, M.D.
    May 14, 1823 - Oct. 5, 1884
    His Wife
    Eugenia Calhoun
    Parker

    Oct. 10, 1825 - May20, 1873
    Blessed Are the Pure in Heart.
    -----
    Eugenia Calhoun Parker was the daughter of William Calhoun (older brother of the famous John C. Calhoun) and granddaughter of pioneer settler Patrick Calhoun.
    Parker Family Plaque image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, September 10, 2010
    25. Parker Family Plaque
    In Memory of
    William Henry Parker
    1 Jan. 1826 - 7 Feb. 1905
    and his wife
    Lucia Garvey
    22 Apr. 1833 - 29 Oct. 1897
    ----------
    Numbered with thy saints
    in glory everlasting.
    Thomas Parker image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, November 21, 2009
    26. Thomas Parker
    Erected
    to the Memory of
    Thomas Parker
    the founder of the
    Episcopal Church
    in
    Abbeville District,
    by this Congregation.
    ----------
    "The righteous shall be in
    everlasting remembrance."
    Mamie Lawson Link Plaque image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, September 10, 2010
    27. Mamie Lawson Link Plaque
    In Loving Memory
    of
    Mamie Lawson Link
    Sept. 11, 1863
    Sept. 23, 1901
    The Lord is My Shepherd
    J. Townes Robertson image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, November 21, 2009
    28. J. Townes Robertson
    In Memory of
    J. Townes Robertson
    1832 --- 1905
    Colonel of Orr's Regiment
    His Wife
    Eugenia Miller
    Robertson

    1852 --- 1894
    Erected by the Children
    Pearl Martin Beckwith Plaque image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, September 10, 2010
    29. Pearl Martin Beckwith Plaque
    In Memory of
    Pearl Martin
    Beckwith

    Mar. 4, 1884
    Oct., 1, 1947
    This marker placed by
    John and Mary Beckwith
    and their children.
    Gary Brothers image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, September 10, 2010
    30. Gary Brothers
    Eugene B. Gary Jr.
    Apr. 16, 1890
    Oct. 14, 1918
    Died in France
    Ernest Gary
    Dec. 3, 1896
    Mar. 1, 1914
    ----------
    Blessed are the pure in heart.
    William Augustus Lee Plaque image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, September 10, 2010
    31. William Augustus Lee Plaque
    William Augustus Lee
    Mar. 2, 1826
    Oct. 23, 1896
    "Blessed are the dead
    who die in the Lord
    ."
    William Edwin Parker III image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, September 10, 2010
    32. William Edwin Parker III
    To the Glory of God
    in memory of
    William Edwin Parker III
    1962-1981
    who served as an acolyte
    in this church
    Given by his parents
    William E. and Alice Parker
    In Memoriam<br>Martha Calhoun Burt image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, September 10, 2010
    33. In Memoriam
    Martha Calhoun Burt
    Trinity Episcopal Church Member Plaque -<br>John A. Calhoun image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, September 10, 2010
    34. Trinity Episcopal Church Member Plaque -
    John A. Calhoun
    Nephew of John C. Calhoun
    Signer of Ordinance of
    Secession in Charleston
    1860
    Trinity Episcopal Church Member Plaque -<br>Edward Noble image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, September 10, 2010
    35. Trinity Episcopal Church Member Plaque -
    Edward Noble
    Son of Patrick Noble S.C. Gov. 1838-1846
    Proposed Secession Resolution at
    Abbeville Meeting Nov. 20, 1860
    Signed Ordinance of Secession
    Trinity Episcopal Church Member Plaque -<br>Trenholms image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, September 10, 2010
    36. Trinity Episcopal Church Member Plaque -
    Trenholms
    Canon John Peter Trenholm
    1929 - 2008
    Julianne Dye Trenholm
    1929 - 2009
    Myra Davis Keith
    Trinity Episcopal Church Member Plaque #7 -<br>Gen, Samuel McGowan image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, September 10, 2010
    37. Trinity Episcopal Church Member Plaque #7 -
    Gen, Samuel McGowan
    Major General in Mexican War
    Led "McGowan's Brigade" at
    Chancellorsville, Va.
    with A.N.V. until 1865
    Trinity Episcopal Church Member Plaque #12 -<br>D.F. Jones image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, September 10, 2010
    38. Trinity Episcopal Church Member Plaque #12 -
    D.F. Jones
    Intendent (Mayor) of the
    Abbeville District in 1860
    Trinity Episcopal Church Member Plaque #13 -<br>William H. Parker image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, September 10, 2010
    39. Trinity Episcopal Church Member Plaque #13 -
    William H. Parker
    Son of Thomas Parker - the
    founder of Trinity Church 1842
    Served in S.C. Legislature
    Trinity Episcopal Church Member Plaque #14 -<br>J. Foster Marshall image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, September 10, 2010
    40. Trinity Episcopal Church Member Plaque #14 -
    J. Foster Marshall
    State Senator 1848-1862
    Killed at Second Battle of
    Manassas - 1862
    Trinity Episcopal Church Member Plaque #15 -<br>Augustus M. Smith image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, September 10, 2010
    41. Trinity Episcopal Church Member Plaque #15 -
    Augustus M. Smith
    Chief Marshall of the Day of
    Abbeville Meeting - Nov. 20, 1860
    Died of wounds at Gaines Mill, Va.
    1862
    Trinity Episcopal Church Member Plaque #21 -<br>Andrew Simonds image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, September 10, 2010
    42. Trinity Episcopal Church Member Plaque #21 -
    Andrew Simonds
    First President of the Bank
    of the State of South Carolina
    Abbeville branch which served
    the entire western part of the state.
    Trinity Episcopal Church Member Plaque #23 -<br>Armistead Burt image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, September 10, 2010
    43. Trinity Episcopal Church Member Plaque #23 -
    Armistead Burt
    U.S. Congress 1843 - 1853
    Jefferson Davis held his last
    Cabinet meeting at Burt House
    May 2, 1865
    Trinity Episcopal Church Interior (Southwest Wall) image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, September 27, 2008
    44. Trinity Episcopal Church Interior (Southwest Wall)
    Trinity Episcopal Church Cancel image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, May 2, 2009
    45. Trinity Episcopal Church Cancel
    Trinity Episcopal Church Gallery image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, May 2, 2009
    46. Trinity Episcopal Church Gallery
    Interior of Stained Glass Window in Gallery image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, September 27, 2008
    47. Interior of Stained Glass Window in Gallery
    Trinity Episcopal Church Interior - Southwest Stained Glass Window image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, May 2, 2009
    48. Trinity Episcopal Church Interior - Southwest Stained Glass Window
    The large chancel window was a gift from a "Greenville church" and was ordered from England to be placed at the time of consecration. Unfortunately, the window did not arrive until 1863, having run the blockade in Charleston harbor.
    Trinity Episcopal Church -<br>Epiphany Window image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, November 21, 2009
    49. Trinity Episcopal Church -
    Epiphany Window
    Trinity Episcopal Church Interior -<br>From Auditorium Looking into Chancel image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, November 21, 2009
    50. Trinity Episcopal Church Interior -
    From Auditorium Looking into Chancel
    Trinity Episcopal Church Interior -<br>From Auditorium Looking into Chancel image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, September 10, 2010
    51. Trinity Episcopal Church Interior -
    From Auditorium Looking into Chancel
    Trinity Episcopal Church Interior - From Chancel Looking into the Auditorium image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, September 10, 2010
    52. Trinity Episcopal Church Interior - From Chancel Looking into the Auditorium
    Trinity Episcopal Church Interior -<br>Vestibule (Northeast Entrance) image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, September 10, 2010
    53. Trinity Episcopal Church Interior -
    Vestibule (Northeast Entrance)
    John Baker Organ -<br>Dates from 1860 image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, November 21, 2009
    54. John Baker Organ -
    Dates from 1860
    John Baker Organ image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, September 10, 2010
    55. John Baker Organ
    Trinity Episcopal Church -<br>Towering Over Trinity Street<br>During Abbeville's Spring Festival image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, May 2, 2009
    56. Trinity Episcopal Church -
    Towering Over Trinity Street
    During Abbeville's Spring Festival
    Trinity Episcopal Church image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, September 27, 2008
    57. Trinity Episcopal Church
    Trinity Episcopal Church -<br>Looking West Along Trinity Street image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, February 3, 2009
    58. Trinity Episcopal Church -
    Looking West Along Trinity Street
    Trinity Street -<br>Looking East from the Portico of Trinity Church image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, April 8, 2011
    59. Trinity Street -
    Looking East from the Portico of Trinity Church
    Jehu Foster Marshall<br>(1817-1862) image. Click for full size.
    60. Jehu Foster Marshall
    (1817-1862)
    South Carolina Senate (1848-1862)
    J. Foster Marshall Memorial image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, September 27, 2008
    61. J. Foster Marshall Memorial
    J. Foster Marshall and his wife are the only people buried in the Trinity churchyard. (Other early members of the church are buried in the cemetery southwest of the church.) Their grave is located on the west side of the church property.
    J. Foster Marshall Memorial image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, September 27, 2008
    62. J. Foster Marshall Memorial
    Jehu Foster Marshall
    Born Aug. 26, 1817,
    Killed in Battle Aug 29, 1862.
    Served thro the Mexican War
    as Captain of the Abbeville
    Volunteers Palmetto Reg.
    On his return from Mexico
    elected state senator for
    Abbeville Dist. which office
    he held until his death.
    J. Foster Marshall Memorial image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, September 27, 2008
    63. J. Foster Marshall Memorial
    At the commencement of
    the war he offered his services
    to the Confederate
    government as Colonel
    of their First Regiment of
    Rifles South Carolina
    Volunteers. He fell at the
    Second Battle of Manassas.
    J. Foster Marshall Monument image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, November 21, 2009
    64. J. Foster Marshall Monument
    Trinity Episcopal Church Cemetery image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott
    65. Trinity Episcopal Church Cemetery
    Trinity Episcopal Church Cemetery image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott
    66. Trinity Episcopal Church Cemetery
    Trinity Episcopal Church Cemetery image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott
    67. Trinity Episcopal Church Cemetery
    Major Armistead & Martha Calhoun Burt Tombstone image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, November 21, 2009
    68. Major Armistead & Martha Calhoun Burt Tombstone
    William Henry Parker / Lucia Garvey Wardlaw Tombstone image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, November 21, 2009
    69. William Henry Parker / Lucia Garvey Wardlaw Tombstone
    Son of Thomas and Ellen Frost Parker
    1 January 1828 -- 7 February 1905
    A Man of Few Honours but Honored Much
    Much Trusted Even True
    With Singleness of Aim Unselfish Loyalty and Wise Judgement
    In Camp and Hall He Served His Country Well
    He Stood for What was Right
    In Scorn of Consequence
    Through All His Life He Never Stooped for Gain or Place
    Truth Justice Mercy Swayed Him
    An Honest Man, an Earnest Christian, an Unsullied Gentleman
    His Children Gratefully Record His Worth
    And Their Devotion
    William Henry Parker / Lucia Garvey Wardlaw Tombstone image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, November 21, 2009
    70. William Henry Parker / Lucia Garvey Wardlaw Tombstone
    Wife of William Henry Parker
    Daughter of David Lewis and Sarah Allen Wardlaw
    22 April, 1833 - 29 October, 1897
    A Perfect Wife and Mother, A Most True Friend
    Many Sought Her Loved Council
    Many Were Comforted by Her Tender Sympathy
    She Trod the Path of Duty
    Shedding Round Her a Gracious Influence
    In the Love of God, In Uplifting Faith, In Charity With All.
    The Memory of Her Sweet Life is a Rich Heritage.
    Thomas Drayton Parker Tombstone image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, November 21, 2009
    71. Thomas Drayton Parker Tombstone
    Commander United States Navy
    Son of
    William Henry and Lucia Garvey Parker
    Spanish Campaign - Philippine Campaign
    World War I
    August 3, 1871 - January 5, 1950
    Francis LeJau Parker Tombstone image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, November 21, 2009
    72. Francis LeJau Parker Tombstone
    Brigadier General United States Army
    Son of
    William Henry & Lucia Garvey Wardlaw Parker
    West Point 1894
    Spanish War - Philippine Insurrection
    World War I
    24 June 1873 -- 16 May 1966
    Lucia Wardlaw Parker Tombstone image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, November 21, 2009
    73. Lucia Wardlaw Parker Tombstone
    Daughter of
    William Henry and Lucia Garvey Parker
    November 3, 1875 - April 21, 1948.
    Allen Wardlaw Parker Tombstone image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, November 21, 2009
    74. Allen Wardlaw Parker Tombstone
    16 June, 1867
    3 Aug. 1891
    He that hath clean hands
    and a pure heart -
    who hath not lifted up
    his soul unto vanity.
    Nor sworn deceitfully -
    he shall receive
    the blessing from the Lord.
    What I do thou knowest not now,
    but thou shall known hereafter.
    James Townes Robertson Tombstone image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, November 21, 2009
    75. James Townes Robertson Tombstone
    Aug 19, 1832 -- Aug 31, 1905
    Lieutenant Colonel
    Orr's Regiment of Rifles
    McGowan's Brigade
    C.S.A.
    Eugenia Miller Robertson Tombstone image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, November 21, 2009
    76. Eugenia Miller Robertson Tombstone
    Wife of J.Townes
    Robertson
    Born Oct. 11, 1852,
    Died May 30, 1894.
    Augustus Marshall Smith Tombstone -<br>South Inscription image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, November 21, 2009
    77. Augustus Marshall Smith Tombstone -
    South Inscription
    Here
    Lies the Body of
    Augustus Marshall Smith
    Born October 22, 1827,
    died in Richmond, Va.
    June 30, 1862,
    of a wound received in the
    battle of Gaines' Mill.
    Augustus Marshall Smith Tombstone -<br>East Inscription image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, November 21, 2009
    78. Augustus Marshall Smith Tombstone -
    East Inscription
    His high spirit made him
    one of the earliest devotees
    to the Confederate cause.
    His gallant demeanor raised him
    through intermediate grades
    from a private to Lieut. Colonel
    of the First (Gregg's Regiment)
    So. Ca. Volunteers.
    Augustus Marshall Smith Tombstone -<br>North Inscription image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, November 21, 2009
    79. Augustus Marshall Smith Tombstone -
    North Inscription
    He Asked much and gave all.
    A Widow and two sons
    ??? his reputation
    as their only ???.
     
     
    Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 29, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 4,697 times since then and 159 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on September 29, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on November 21, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   7, 8. submitted on September 29, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   9. submitted on January 25, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   10. submitted on September 29, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   11. submitted on November 22, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   12. submitted on September 29, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   13. submitted on January 25, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   14. submitted on October 12, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   15, 16. submitted on September 29, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   17. submitted on May 7, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   18. submitted on October 12, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   19. submitted on November 21, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   20. submitted on November 19, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   21. submitted on November 21, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   22. submitted on October 12, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   23. submitted on November 21, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   24. submitted on November 21, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   25. submitted on October 12, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   26. submitted on November 21, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   27. submitted on October 12, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   28. submitted on November 21, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43. submitted on October 12, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   44. submitted on September 29, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   45, 46. submitted on May 7, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   47. submitted on September 29, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   48. submitted on May 7, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   49, 50. submitted on November 21, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   51, 52, 53. submitted on October 12, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   54. submitted on November 22, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   55. submitted on October 12, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   56. submitted on May 7, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   57. submitted on November 22, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   58. submitted on November 20, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   59. submitted on April 27, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   60. submitted on August 21, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   61. submitted on September 29, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   62, 63. submitted on November 20, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   64. submitted on June 24, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   65, 66, 67. submitted on November 21, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79. submitted on November 22, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.
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