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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Owensboro in Daviess County, Kentucky — The American South (East South Central)
 

Daviess Co. U.S. Colored Troops in the Civil War

 
 
Daviess CO. U.S. Colored Troops in the Civil War Marker (<i>side 1</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, September 17, 2017
1. Daviess CO. U.S. Colored Troops in the Civil War Marker (side 1)
Inscription.
(side 1)
In 1864, several hundred enslaved African American men joined the Union army here. Enlisting in the army meant eventual freedom for the men and their families. Units raised in Daviess Co. took part in important operations at Richmond, Petersburg, and Lee's surrender at Appomattox, as well as campaigns in Kentucky, Tennessee, and Louisiana.

(side 2)
Recruits served in the 100th, 109th, and 118th U.S. Colored Infantry and the 5th and 6th U.S. Colored Cavalry. There was much opposition among pro-slavery Kentucky Unionists to the recruitment of slaves. Therefore, black men in Daviess Co. took great risks to themselves and their families by enlisting in the army.
 
Erected 2015 by Kentucky Historical Society & Kentucky Department of Highways. (Marker Number 2467.)
 
Location. 37° 46.479′ N, 87° 6.791′ W. Marker is in Owensboro, Kentucky, in Daviess County. Marker is on West 2nd Street east of Frederica Street, on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is located on the north side of the Daviess County Courthouse grounds. Marker is at or near this postal address: 212 St Ann Street, Owensboro KY 42303, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within
Daviess CO. U.S. Colored Troops in the Civil War Marker (<i>side 2</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, September 17, 2017
2. Daviess CO. U.S. Colored Troops in the Civil War Marker (side 2)
9 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Medal of Honor Winners (a few steps from this marker); Courthouse Burned (within shouting distance of this marker); Daviess Countians Who Served (within shouting distance of this marker); Confederate Congressional Medal of Honor (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); George Graham Vest / "Tribute to a Dog" (about 400 feet away); Wendell H. Ford (about 400 feet away); Vietnam Honor Roll (approx. 8 miles away in Indiana); Abraham Lincoln (approx. 8.1 miles away in Indiana). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Owensboro.
 
Also see . . .
1. Daviess CO. U.S. Colored Troops in the Civil War. A 1792 law barring free blacks from bearing arms in the U.S. Army restricted African American enlistments initially during the Civil War. Abraham Lincoln also had concerns that permitting black men to serve in the military would drive boarder states like Kentucky to secede. The Second Confiscation and Militia Act of 1862 freed slaves who had masters serving in the Confederate army and authorized the formation of black regiments to build fortifications, guard critical positions, and provide other labor. By the end of the war, over 179,000 blacks served in over 160 units and fought in over 400 military engagements. (Submitted on July 7, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
Daviess CO. U.S. Colored Troops in the Civil War Marker (<i>tall view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, September 17, 2017
3. Daviess CO. U.S. Colored Troops in the Civil War Marker (tall view)

2. United States Colored Troops. The U.S. Congress passed the Confiscation Act of 1862 in July 1862. It freed slaves whose owners were in rebellion against the United States, and Militia Act of 1862 empowered the President to use former slaves in any capacity in the army. The United States Colored Troops (USCT) were regiments in the United States Army composed primarily of African-American (colored) soldiers, although members of other minority groups also served with the units. They were first recruited during the American Civil War, and by the end of that war in April 1865, the 175 USCT regiments constituted about one-tenth of the manpower of the Union Army. (Submitted on July 7, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. African AmericansWar, US Civil
 
Daviess CO. U.S. Colored Troops in the Civil War Marker (<i>wide view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, September 17, 2017
4. Daviess CO. U.S. Colored Troops in the Civil War Marker (wide view)
Daviess CO. U.S. Colored Troops in the Civil War Marker (<i>side 2 wide view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, September 17, 2017
5. Daviess CO. U.S. Colored Troops in the Civil War Marker (side 2 wide view)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 7, 2018. This page originally submitted on July 6, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 77 times since then. Photos:   1. submitted on July 6, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on July 7, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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