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Holmesville in Holmes County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Birthplace of William M. McCulloch

Civil Rights Champion

 
 
Birthplace of William M. McCulloch Marker, Side One image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, July 1, 2018
1. Birthplace of William M. McCulloch Marker, Side One
Inscription. Republican congressman William M. McCulloch was one of the architects of the landmark Civil Rights Act of 1964, the first of three laws to recommit the nation to the cause of civil rights in the 1960s. “Bill” McCulloch was born near Holmesville to James H. and Ida McCulloch on November 24, 1901. Raised on the family farm, he attended local public schools. the College of Wooster, and, in 1925, earned his law degree from the Ohio State University. He married his childhood sweetheart Mabel Harris McCulloch (1904-1990) in 1927, after settling in Jacksonville to start his career during the Florida land-boom of the 1920s. It was in Jacksonville that the Deep Souths racial intolerance seared him.

The McCullochs returned to Ohio in 1928 and Bill joined a law firm in Piqua. He entered politics in 1932, winning election to the Ohio General Assembly. He was Speaker of the Ohio House from 1939–1944 and, after service in army during World War II, was elected the representative from the Fourth Ohio Congressional District, serving from 1498–1973. He rose to become the ranking member of the House Judiciary Committee. Seeing himself as an upholder of Republicans’ commitment to civil rights, dating from the founding of the party, McCulloch co-sponsored what became the Civil Rights Act of 1964, adroitly guiding
Birthplace of William M. McCulloch Marker, Side Two image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, July 1, 2018
2. Birthplace of William M. McCulloch Marker, Side Two
it to passage. He died in 1980 and is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.
 
Erected 2018 by The Ohio History Connection. (Marker Number 4-28.)
 
Location. 40° 37.866′ N, 81° 54.982′ W. Marker is in Holmesville, Ohio, in Holmes County. Marker is on Jackson Street (County Route 192) just east of West Market Street, on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. It is on the Holmes County Trail (former Pennsylvania Railroad right of way) a hiking, bicycle and horse-drawn carriage trail that runs 23 miles from Fredericksburg to Gann, as it resumes north of town. Marker is in this post office area: Holmesville OH 44633, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 7 other markers are within 14 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Holmes County Veterans Memorial (approx. 5.3 miles away); Calmoutier (approx. 7.6 miles away); VFW Post 7079 POW/MIA Memorial (approx. 10.1 miles away); Barnhart Rice Homestead / Frederick Rice (approx. 10˝ miles away); To the Heroes (approx. 10.9 miles away); Jonas Stutzman (approx. 12.3 miles away); Holmes County Draft Riots (approx. 13.4 miles away).
 
Also see . . .  William M. McCulloch. Article in Ohio History Central. “McCulloch fought another major battle in 1969-1970
View from Jackson Street image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, July 1, 2018
3. View from Jackson Street
Brown historical marker is difficult to see in the shadows. I drove past it on Jackson Street numerous times before I spotted it.
by defending the renewal of certain temporary provisions in the 1965 Voting Rights Act during the Nixon administration. Directed at Southern states with a history of discriminatory voting practices, a strong provision in the legislation demanded that these states obtain clearance through the Justice Department before making any changes that would affect the voting process. The Nixon Administration argued for cutting back on the provision, while McCulloch fought for its retention in a still volatile voting environment. McCulloch and his legislative allies succeeded in keeping the landmark bill intact, echoing his belief as stated on the House floor before the signing of the 1964 Civil Rights Act that ‘no statutory law can completely end discrimination. Intelligent work and vigilance by members of all races will be required for many years before discrimination completely disappears ... To create hope of immediate and complete success can only promote conflict and result in brooding despair.’ McCulloch continued to champion equal rights and to protect the landmark legislation of the 1960s until his retirement in 1972.” (Submitted on July 8, 2018.) 
 
Categories. 20th CenturyCivil RightsGovernmentNotable PersonsPoliticsWar, World II
 
Birthplace of William M. McCulloch Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, July 1, 2018
4. Birthplace of William M. McCulloch Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 8, 2018. This page originally submitted on July 8, 2018, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio. This page has been viewed 57 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on July 8, 2018, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio.
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