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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Los Angeles in Los Angeles County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Pico House

El Pueblo de Los Angeles

 
 
Pico House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, July 28, 2010
1. Pico House Marker
Inscription.  The Pico House was built by Pio Pico, last Governor of California under Mexican rule, who lived almost the entire length of the nineteenth century from 1801 to 1894. This was the first three story building and the first grand hotel in Los Angeles. Pico chose architect Ezra F. Kysor to design the "finest hotel in Los Angeles." To raise funds for the building and furnishing of the hotel, Pio and his brother Andres sold most of their vast landholdings in the San Fernando Valley. Construction began on September 18, 1869, and the hotel opened for business on June 9, 1870.

The hotel was built in the Italianate style, with deep set round-arched windows and doors. The Main Street and Plaza facades were stuccoed to resemble blue granite. The hotel had eighty two bedrooms and twenty one parlors as well as bathrooms and water closets for each sex on each floor. A French chef presided over a large dining room on the first floor. The Pico House was decorated with furniture of the best quality, with walnut pieces on the second floor and lighter woods but still "pleasing to the eye and of good quality" on the third floor. Many of the bedrooms opened
Pico House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Baker, February 6, 2018
2. Pico House Marker
Hidden under the tree leaves. Every small tree along Main Street has a marker describing the historic buildings on this block.
into an interior court festooned with vines and birdcages.

The prime period of the hotel was in 1876 when the railroad came to Los Angeles and when Archduke Ludwig Salvator of Austria stayed there. Unfortunately, Pio Pico was not to profit from his hotel as he lost it to foreclosure in 1880 because of non-payment of debts. The hotel management changed frequently in the ensuing years. Many of the proprietors were of French or Italian origin. Around 1882 a balcony was added to the Plaza and Main street facades and its name was changed for several decades to the National Hotel. The hotel gradually declined and was taken over by the state in 1953. (Marker Number 159.)
 
Location. 34° 3.381′ N, 118° 14.364′ W. Marker is in Los Angeles, California, in Los Angeles County. Marker is on North Main Street near Arcadia Street, on the right when traveling north. Marker is located at El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historic Monument. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 430 North Main Street, Los Angeles CA 90012, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Merced Theatre (within shouting distance of this marker); Father Junipero Serra 1713-1784 (within shouting distance of this marker); Nuestra Señora la Reina de Los Angeles (within shouting distance of this marker); Plaza Fire House
Pico House (1870) image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, July 28, 2010
3. Pico House (1870)
(within shouting distance of this marker); Los Angeles Plaza (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Chinese Massacre (about 300 feet away); The Old Spanish Trail (about 300 feet away); First Mayor of Los Angeles Under United States Rule (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Los Angeles.
 
More about this marker. This is California Historic Landmark 159.
 
Also see . . .
1. Pio Pico (1801 - 1894) - Find A Grave Memorial. (Submitted on December 27, 2011, by Michael Kindig of Long Beach, California.)
2. Pico House - Wikipedia. Along with a short article there are several photos of the building. (Submitted on January 2, 2012, by Keith S Smith of West Chester, Pennsylvania.) 
 
Categories. Hispanic AmericansIndustry & CommerceNotable Buildings
 
Pico House (1870) image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, July 28, 2010
4. Pico House (1870)
Pico House (1870) image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, July 28, 2010
5. Pico House (1870)
Pico House (1870) image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, July 28, 2010
6. Pico House (1870)
Pico House (1870) image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, July 28, 2010
7. Pico House (1870)
Pico House (1870) image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, July 28, 2010
8. Pico House (1870)
The marker is to the right underneath a tree in this view.
Pico House (1870) image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, July 28, 2010
9. Pico House (1870)
Pico House image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, January 2, 2010
10. Pico House
 

More. Search the internet for Pico House.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 31, 2018. This page originally submitted on December 26, 2011, by Michael Kindig of Long Beach, California. This page has been viewed 865 times since then and 35 times this year. Last updated on July 30, 2018, by Craig Baker of Sylmar, California. Photos:   1. submitted on December 26, 2011, by Michael Kindig of Long Beach, California.   2. submitted on February 6, 2018, by Craig Baker of Sylmar, California.   3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on December 27, 2011, by Michael Kindig of Long Beach, California.   10. submitted on May 28, 2012, by Denise Boose of Tehachapi, California. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.
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