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Near Gettysburg in Adams County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Cabell's Battalion

McLaws's Division - Longstreet's Corps

 

—Army of Northern Virginia —

 
Cabell's Battalion Tablet image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 17, 2008
1. Cabell's Battalion Tablet
Inscription.
C.S.A.
Army of Northern Virginia
Longstreet's Corps McLaws's Division
Cabell's Battalion

Fraser's, McCarthy's, Carlton's
and Manly's Batteries
Four Napoleons, Four 10 pounder Parrotts
Six 3 inch Rifles, Two 12 pounder Howitzers

July 2-3 Took an active part in the battle.

July 4 Remained in position near here and withdrew from the field after night.

Ammunition expended about 3300 rounds.
Losses. Killed 12, wounded 30, missing 4.
Horses killed or disabled 80.
 
Erected 1910 by Gettysburg National Military Park Commission.
 
Location. 39° 47.824′ N, 77° 15.333′ W. Marker is near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in Adams County. Marker is on West Confederate Avenue, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Located just south of the Longstreet Observation tower in Gettysburg National Military Park. Marker is in this post office area: Gettysburg PA 17325, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Carlton's Battery - Cabell's Battalion (within shouting distance of this marker); McCarthy's Battery - Cabell's Battalion (within shouting distance of this marker); South Carolina (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Manly's Battery - Cabell's Battalion (about 400 feet away); Kershaw's Brigade
Cabell's Battalion Tablet image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 17, 2008
2. Cabell's Battalion Tablet
(about 500 feet away); Semmes's Brigade (about 600 feet away); Georgia (about 700 feet away); Fraser's Battery - Cabell's Battalion (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Gettysburg.
 
Also see . . .
1. Longstreet's Headquarters. A National Park Service virtual tour stop. The tablet is close to this stop location. (Submitted on October 11, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Report of Col. H. C. Cabell. Of the actions on July 2, Col. Cabell wrote:
When we commenced to ascend the road leading to the crest of the hill, where the battle was subsequently fought my battalion moved to the head of the column. Near the crest of the hill, I turned to the right, and placed the battalion in position on the edge of the wood, the right resting near the road leading from Gettysburg to Emmitsburg. One horse was wounded while crossing the field, although this movement was made beyond the view of the enemy. On our right, and slightly in front, the enemy occupied a rocky mountain with several batteries, and directly in front, about 600 or 700 yards distant, were a large number of batteries, occupying a peach orchard. Receiving orders, we opened a most effective fire upon these batteries. Exposed ourselves to a flanking fire from the enemy's mountain batteries, our position gave us a similar advantage in firing upon a large part of his
Cabell's View of the Second Day Battlefield image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain
3. Cabell's View of the Second Day Battlefield
Cabell's Battalion provided supporting fire for McLaws' infantry advancing against the Federal III Corps sector south of the Peach Orchard. In this panoramic view, looking east from the tablet location, the south edge of the Peach Orchard is on the far left. In the center, extending to the right are the Round Tops. Based on the description in Col. Cabell's report, the guns went into action in the fields just in front of the tablet location.
line, which was drawn up nearly parallel with the Emmitsburg road. The battalion, being first to open fire, received for a short time a concentrated fire from the enemy's batteries. The fire from our lines and from the enemy became incessant, rendering it necessary for us sometimes to pause and allow the smoke to clear away, in order to enable the gunners to take aim. During the same time, two guns were ordered to play upon the batteries on the stony mountain--I have reason to believe with great effect.
(Submitted on October 11, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 11, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 694 times since then and 10 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on October 11, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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