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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Butte in Silver Bow County, Montana — The American West (Mountains)
 

Butte-Anaconda-Walkerville

National Historic Landmark

 
 
Butte-Anaconda-Walkerville Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 18, 2016
1. Butte-Anaconda-Walkerville Marker
Inscription.  
Butte-Anaconda
Walkerville


Has been designated a
National Historic Landmark

Atop the “Richest Hill on Earth,” Walkerville was the birthplace of Butte-Anaconda Mining. It was the site of the district’s first mines, and the focus of its first labor strike.

This site possesses national significance
in commemorating the history of the
United States of America
1961

National Park Service
United States Department of the Interior

 
Erected 1961.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the National Historic Landmarks marker series.
 
Location. 46° 1.79′ N, 112° 32.202′ W. Marker is in Butte, Montana, in Silver Bow County. Marker is on West Daly Street west of A Street, on the right when traveling east. Marker is a large metal plaque, mounted at eye-level, directly on the Walkerville (Butte) Post Office building, near the northwest corner of the building, facing West Daly Street. Touch for map.
Butte-Anaconda-Walkerville Marker (<i>wide view; marker visible on right side of building</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 18, 2016
2. Butte-Anaconda-Walkerville Marker (wide view; marker visible on right side of building)
Marker is at or near this postal address: 42 West Daly Street, Butte MT 59701, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 4 other markers are within 13 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Butte-Anaconda Historic District (here, next to this marker); Welcome! To the Top of the World (approx. half a mile away); The Con Headframe (approx. half a mile away); Thompson Park (approx. 12.2 miles away).
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Butte-Anaconda National Historic Landmark District
 
Also see . . .
1. Butte-Anaconda National Historic Landmark District. The Butte-Anaconda National Historic Landmark is a historic district that spans parts of Walkerville, Butte and Anaconda, Montana. It has the most resources of any U.S. National Historic Landmark District. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1961, when it focused only on Butte. In 2006, the district was expanded significantly to include parts of Walkerville and Anaconda, as well as the bed of the Butte, Anaconda and Pacific Railroad. (Submitted on January 1, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Butte-Anaconda-Walkerville National Register of Historic Places Nomination. Located just west of the Continental Divide, on the northern slope of the Summit Valley in southwestern Montana's Silver Bow County, the town of Walkerville lies adjacent to the city of Butte to the north, atop
The "Original" Mine image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 18, 2016
3. The "Original" Mine
1878-1976
3,569 Ft. Deep
Mine Deaths – 43
Butte’s First Copper Mine Site
the "Richest Hill on Earth." Both Butte and Walkerville owe their life to mining and a labyrinth of precious metals deposited deep beneath the earth's surface. Supported by complex technology, outside capital, and railroads, the mines on Butte Hill represented industrial mining on a colossal scale. The community of Anaconda is connected to Butte by a shared history, a valley that extends 26 miles between them, and the BA&P Railway. Anaconda was a one-industry town developed exclusively to provide smelting and refining of the ores from Butte. (Submitted on January 1, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Montana Mines. While the first metal mining was for gold and silver, the real mineral wealth of Montana was found it its copper mines around Butte. The advent of electricity caused a soaring demand for copper, which was abundant in the area. The small town soon became one of the most prosperous cities in the country, especially during World War I. Between 1880 and the early 1990s, Butte produced staggering mineral wealth, including nearly 3 million ounces of gold, 709 million ounces of silver, 855 million pounds of lead, 3.7 billion pounds of manganese, 4.9 billion pounds of zinc, and an incredible 20.8 billion pounds of copper. (Submitted on January 1, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.)
The Mountain Consolidated Mine image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 18, 2016
4. The Mountain Consolidated Mine
”The Con”
1886-1974
5,291 Ft. Deep
Mine Deaths – 172
World’s Largest Copper Producer
 
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceLabor UnionsNatural Resources
 
The Steward Mine image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 18, 2016
5. The Steward Mine
The Steward
1877-1976
3,633 Ft. Deep
Mine Deaths – 79
Butte’s Most Productive Copper-Silver Mine
 

More. Search the internet for Butte-Anaconda-Walkerville.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 2, 2019. This page originally submitted on January 1, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 47 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on January 1, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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