Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Tybee Island in Chatham County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Lazaretto

←—

 
 
Lazaretto Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, October 19, 2008
1. Lazaretto Marker
Inscription. After the repeal of the anti-slavery provision in the Charter of the Colony of Georgia on 1749, an act permitting the importation of slaves ordered the erection of a Lazaretto (Quarantine Station) on Tybee Island. Not until 1767 were 104 acres purchased from Josiah Tattnall for this purpose. Completed the following year, the buildings were situated on the westernmost tip of Tybee, at the mouth of what soon became known as Lazaretto Creek. In its hospital voyagers who arrived ill were treated and those who died were buried in unmarked graves. After continuous use through the Revolution, the Grand Jury reported it in ruinous condition in 1785 and a new station was later erected on Cockspur Island.
 
Erected 1958 by Georgia Historical Commission. (Marker Number 025-64.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Georgia Historical Society/Commission marker series.
 
Location. 32° 0.907′ N, 80° 52.72′ W. Marker is in Tybee Island, Georgia, in Chatham County. Marker is at the intersection of US 80 and Olde Tybee Rd., on the right when traveling east on US 80. Touch for map. east of Lazaretto Creek, Tybee Island. Marker is in this post office area: Tybee Island GA 31328, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8
Lazaretto Marker, looking in direction of arrow on marker...southwest image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2008
2. Lazaretto Marker, looking in direction of arrow on marker...southwest
other markers are within one mile of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Cockspur Island Lighthouse (approx. half a mile away); Long Range Artillery Duel (approx. half a mile away); A Turning Point In History (approx. half a mile away); Federal Batteries on Tybee Island (approx. half a mile away); The Breached Wall (approx. one mile away); Federal Siege Batteries (approx. one mile away); a different marker also named The Breached Wall (approx. one mile away); Store House (approx. one mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Tybee Island.
 
Regarding Lazaretto. A lazaretto or lazaret is a quarantine station for maritime travellers. Lazarets can be ships permanently at anchor, isolated islands, or mainland buildings. Until 1908, lazarets were also used for disinfecting postal items, usually by fumigation.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. Lazaretto Quarantine Station - Essington, PA
 
Also see . . .
1. New Georgia Encyclopedia. Atlantic Slave Trade to Savannah The voyage across the Atlantic Ocean from West Africa to Savannah lasted between four and six months. The duration of the voyage combined with the prolonged confinement of slaves increased the occurrence of infectious diseases. To prevent the spread of disease in Savannah, city officials in 1767 authorized the construction of a nine-story
Lazaretto Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2008
3. Lazaretto Marker
quarantine facility, a lazaretto (Italian for "pest house"), on the west end of Tybee Island. (Submitted on October 25, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

2. Tinicum Township, Pa, near Philadelphia. Historical Marker Recognizes the Lazaretto. The text on the marker will read, "Lazaretto Quarantine Station -- Delaware -- It is believed to be the last remaining quarantine station in the United States. For much of the 19th century, it was where many Europeans were first introduced to the United States." (Submitted on October 25, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. Colonial EraLandmarksNotable Places
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 25, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,353 times since then and 43 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on October 25, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement