Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Newark in Essex County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

“Old First”

 
 
"Old First" Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 25, 2008
1. "Old First" Marker
Inscription.
First Presbyterian Church
organized in 1666,
Abraham Pierson, minister.
Two edifices preceeded
this one, begun in 1787

 
Erected 1964 by State of New Jersey.
 
Location. 40° 44.058′ N, 74° 10.358′ W. Marker is in Newark, New Jersey, in Essex County. Marker is at the intersection of Broad Street and Branford Place, on the right when traveling north on Broad Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 820 Broad Street, Newark NJ 07104, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. First Settlers of Newark ( a few steps from this marker); Newark Covenant ( a few steps from this marker); Revolutionary War Soldiers and Patriots Memorial ( a few steps from this marker); Newark Female Charitable Society ( approx. 0.2 miles away); This Liberty Pole ( approx. mile away); Elisha Boudinot and General Lafayette ( approx. mile away); First School Safety Patrol in America ( approx. mile away); Historic Site-Grace Church ( approx. mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Newark.
 
Also see . . .  First Presbyterian Church. The New Jersey Churchscape. (Submitted on October 26, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.)
Marker on Broad Street image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 25, 2008
2. Marker on Broad Street
 
 
Categories. Churches, Etc.Colonial EraNotable BuildingsWar, US Revolutionary
 
First Presbyterian Church - "Old First" image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 25, 2008
3. First Presbyterian Church - "Old First"
During the Revolutionary War, this church was very pro-Patriot. The minister, Rev. Alexander Macwhortwer, fled the city when Washington retreated across New Jersey in November of 1776, but returned later after the British quit the city.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 26, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 917 times since then and 35 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on October 26, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
Paid Advertisement