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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Gills Rock in Door County, Wisconsin — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Rudder from the “City of Glasgow

Sunk in Lily Bay

 

—Oct. 6, 1917 —

 
<i>City of Glasgow</i> Rudder Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 20, 2018
1. City of Glasgow Rudder Marker
Inscription.  
Rudder from the “City of Glasgow”
Sunk in Lily Bay, Oct. 6, 1917
Raised by Century Divers, Aug. 29, 1971
and donated to the
Door County Maritime Museum.

 
Location. 45° 17.521′ N, 87° 1.266′ W. Marker is in Gills Rock, Wisconsin, in Door County. Marker can be reached from West Wisconsin Bay Road 0.1 miles north of State Highway 42, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is located on the grounds of Death's Door Maritime Museum, beside the City of Glasgow rudder exhibit, near the southeast corner of the museum. Marker is at or near this postal address: 12724 West Wisconsin Bay Road, Ellison Bay WI 54210, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 12 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Skipper (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Pilot Island Site (approx. 2.1 miles away); The Hotz Estate (approx. 4.1 miles away); Ellison Bay (approx. 4½ miles away); Niagara Escarpment (approx. 4½ miles away); Nature of Sister Bay
<i>City of Glasgow</i> Rudder Marker (<i>tall view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 20, 2018
2. City of Glasgow Rudder Marker (tall view)
(approx. 8.7 miles away); Village of Sister Bay (approx. 8.7 miles away); Anderson Dock (approx. 11.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Gills Rock.
 
More about this marker. Marker is an embossed metal tablet, mounted at eye-level on a metal post beside the recovered City of Glasgow rudder.
 
Also see . . .  City of Glasgow (1891). The City of Glasgow started her life as one of the largest Great Lakes wooden freighters carrying bulk cargoes such as coal. The vessel was built in 1891 and continued in various trades until 1907. Then, a fire broke out and she burned to the waterline, sinking and blocking navigation in and out of the port of Green Bay. After much trouble, the Leathem and Smith Company managed to move the City of Glasgow to the city of Green Bay where her machinery was removed and her stern was cut off. They then towed her to Sturgeon Bay where she sat until 1910. Finally, after a year of work, mainly dealing with the gutted aft section of the vessel, Leathem and Smith finished converting the City of Glasgow into a crushed stone barge. On October 6, 1917, the tug John Hunsader was towing both the Glasgow into Sturgeon Bay during a strong storm blowing out of the south. The tow line from the John Hunsader broke leaving the Glasgow on her own. The Sturgeon Bay Coast Guard rescued the crew from the Glasgow, but
Death's Door Maritime Museum (<i>rudder and marker visible at far right</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 20, 2018
3. Death's Door Maritime Museum (rudder and marker visible at far right)
the ship ended up on the beach. She was pumped out, but a number of attempts to free the vessel proved futile. After years of ice, wind and wave damage, the Glasgow was officially abandoned in 1922. (Submitted on March 3, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. DisastersWaterways & Vessels
 
The <i>City of Glasgow</i> rudder is nearly 20 feet tall image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 20, 2018
4. The City of Glasgow rudder is nearly 20 feet tall
<i>City of Glasgow</i> rudder (<i>port side detail</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 20, 2018
5. City of Glasgow rudder (port side detail)
 
More. Search the internet for Rudder from the "City of Glasgow".
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 4, 2019. This page originally submitted on March 2, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 27 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on March 3, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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