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Chicago in Cook County, Illinois — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Mary Bartelme, Illinois’ First Female Judge

 
 
Mary Bartelme, Illinois’ First Female Judge Marker image. Click for full size.
By Paul Fehrenbach, January 1, 1980
1. Mary Bartelme, Illinois’ First Female Judge Marker
Inscription.  This park is named for Mary Bartelme (1866-1954), a pioneering Illinois Lawyer. Bartelme became the first female judge in Illinois (1923) and the second female judge in the United States. Born at Fulton and Halsted Streets in Chicago, she became a teacher and later decided to practice law at a time when women lawyers were a rarity. Bartelme graduated from Northwestern University School of Law in 1894, the only female in her class. Appointed the first woman Public Guardian in Cook County 1897, she served 16 years, taking care of minors without guardians. Bartelme helped draft and lobby for legislation creating the first Juvenile Court in Cook County 1899. The first Juvenile Detention Home was located in the 1600 block of West Adams in 1906. In 1913, Bartelme was chosen to assist the Cook County presiding judge, holding closed sessions for juvenile cases and creating a “girls court” as an alternative to jail. She founded three group homes for delinquent girls called “Mary Bartelme Clubs.” Elected judge in 1923, Bartelme served in Juvenile Court for ten years and heard over 50,000 cases. She also served as president of the Women’s
Mary Bartelme, Illinois’ First Female Judge Marker image. Click for full size.
By Paul Fehrenbach, January 1, 1980
2. Mary Bartelme, Illinois’ First Female Judge Marker
looking southeast into park
Bar Association of Illinois from 1927-28. Bartleme made important symbolic contributions to the feminist movement, was an agent for procedural change, and worked tirelessly as a reformer and fundraiser, making a positive difference in the lives of many young girls.
 
Erected 2011 by Alderman Robert W. Fioretti, Chicago Park District, University of Illinois at Chicago and Hull House Museum, Women’s Bar Association of Illinois, Northwestern University Law School, Scott R. Maeself Family, Leslie Recht, West Loop Community Organization, and The Illinois State Historical Society.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Illinois State Historical Society marker series.
 
Location. 41° 52.821′ N, 87° 39.033′ W. Marker is in Chicago, Illinois, in Cook County. Marker is at the intersection of West Monroe Street and South Sangamon Street, on the right when traveling east on West Monroe Street. Touch for map. Marker is located in the northwest corner of the park. Marker is in this post office area: Chicago IL 60607, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. St. Patrick's Church (approx. 0.3 miles away); Site of the Haymarket Tragedy (approx. half a mile away); Jane Addams' Hull House (approx. 0.6 miles away); Jane Addams' Hull-House and Dining Hall (approx. 0.6 miles away); Chicago & North Western Railway Powerhouse (approx. 0.6 miles away); Saint Frances Xavier Cabrini (approx. 0.7 miles away); Site of the Sauganash Hotel/Wigwam (approx. 0.8 miles away); Wacker Drive (approx. 0.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Chicago.
 
Categories. Notable PersonsWomen
 
More. Search the internet for Mary Bartelme, Illinois’ First Female Judge.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 13, 2019. This page originally submitted on April 11, 2019, by Paul Fehrenbach of Germantown, Wisconsin. This page has been viewed 32 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on April 11, 2019, by Paul Fehrenbach of Germantown, Wisconsin. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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