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Brooklyn in Kings County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Altar to Liberty

1776 – 1919

 
 
Altar to Liberty Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 1, 2008
1. Altar to Liberty Marker
Inscription.
On this Battle Hill, facing the Statue of Liberty, this altar is erected to commemorate the Battle of Long Island. The first engagement of which was fought on this site, August 27, 1776, between General Lord Stirling with 2,000 Americans and General Grant with 6,000 British. This was the first battle of the nation and the first stroke for our great American charter of rights and liberties, the Declaration of Independence. Erected 1919.

Left of Altar:
Stirling’s Vow
“Here and along the slopes of Greenwoods Hills, our patriots for the first time faced their foe in open field, and well we stood this test. ‘Men!’ cried Lord Stirling, as we formed our line, ‘this Grant who comes against us once declared in England’s House of Commons – I sat there and heard – that given him five thousand men he’d cross our continent from end to end! He has his number now! I doubt not; We a fourth as many, yet I promise you he’ll march no farther through our continent than Brower’s Mill ponds yonder.’ ”

Rear of Altar:
“The place whereon thou standest is holy ground”
Glory to the memory of out first national heroes who fought and fell
on this battle ground to win our liberty and independence!

Minerva, the goddess of wisdom, glory and patriotism, here salutes the goddess
Left Side of Altar image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 1, 2008
2. Left Side of Altar
of liberty and enwreaths this altar in tribute to the heroes of American liberty and to the wisdom of American institutions.

Right of Altar:
Declaration of Independence
July 4, 1776
The wisest document ever written, of human rights and liberties, basic ethics, civic religion and democratic government. All these are expressed in this one essential paragraph “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal. That they are endowed by their creator with certain unalienable rights, that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. That to secure these rights, governments are instituted among men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed.”
Equality – Liberty – Human Rights

 
Erected 1919.
 
Location. 40° 39.435′ N, 73° 59.362′ W. Marker is in Brooklyn, New York, in Kings County. Marker can be reached from Battle Avenue, on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in Green-Wood Cemetery on Battle Path off Battle Avenue. Marker is in this post office area: Brooklyn NY 11232, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Battle Hill (a few steps from this marker); Huntington’s Regiment
Back of Altar image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 1, 2008
3. Back of Altar
(a few steps from this marker); Triumph on Battle Hill (a few steps from this marker); Civil War Soldiers’ Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); The Battle of Brooklyn (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Battle of Brooklyn (within shouting distance of this marker); McDonald (within shouting distance of this marker); Our Drummer Boy (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Brooklyn.
 
Also see . . .
1. Americans Fought From Treetops in Last Stand On Battle Hill. New York Freedom Trail website. (Submitted on November 2, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. Battle of Long Island, August 27, 1776. (Submitted on November 2, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.)
3. The Battle of Long Island 1776. A British perspective of the battle from BritishBattles.com. (Submitted on November 2, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. Notable EventsNotable PlacesWar, US Revolutionary
 
Right Side of Altar image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 1, 2008
4. Right Side of Altar
Closeup of Minerva image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 1, 2008
5. Closeup of Minerva
Minerva, the goddess of wisdom, glory and patriotism, holds up her hand in a salute to the Statue of Liberty which is visible from the Altar of Liberty.
Altar to Liberty image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 1, 2008
6. Altar to Liberty
This monument, erected in 1919 on the highest point in Brooklyn, was for many years the only monument to the Battle of Long Island. The first extended fighting of the August 27, 1776 battle occurred on this hill.
Minerva and the Statue of Liberty image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 20, 2013
7. Minerva and the Statue of Liberty
The statue of Minerva looks directly at the Statue of Liberty, visible in the harbor.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 2, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,359 times since then and 30 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on November 2, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   7. submitted on October 21, 2013, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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