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Stanton in Chilton County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

Battle at Ebenezer Baptist Church

 
 
Battle at Ebenezer Baptist Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, May 7, 2019
1. Battle at Ebenezer Baptist Church Marker
Inscription.  On April 1, 1865 near here the forces of Lt Gen Nathan Bedford Forrest, CSA, engaged the forces of Maj Gen James H. Wilson, USA. The 17th Indiana Infantry Regiment, led by Lt Col Frank White, made a cavalry charge with sabers, resulting in hand to hand combat with Confederate forces. Capt James D. Taylor, Co G Commander, 17th Indiana, hit Forrest several times with his saber wounding him on the left arm before Forrest shot and killed Taylor. After a brief but initially heavy engagement, Forrest and his forces retreated to the defenses of Selma. Confederate casualties are unknown. Union casualties were 12 killed and 40 wounded.

The 12 Union Killed Here Were:

Capt James D. Taylor, Co G, 17th Indiana Infantry
Corporal William S. Evans, Co G, 17th Indiana Infantry
Private Clement M. Griffith, Co G, 17th Indiana Infantry
Private John D. Harn, Co I, 17th Indiana Infantry
Private Jason S. McMullen, Co G, 17th Indiana Infantry
Private John Shawhan, Co G, 17th Indiana Infantry
Private Andrew J. Summa, Co G, 17th Indiana Infantry
Private Elijah Sutphin, Co G, 17th Indiana Infantry
Private
Battle at Ebenezer Baptist Church Marker under cedar trees at the cemetery. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, May 7, 2019
2. Battle at Ebenezer Baptist Church Marker under cedar trees at the cemetery.
Samuel Young, Co F, 7th Ohio Cavalry
2d Lt Grasson L. Cole, Co L, 7th Ohio Cavalry
Sgt Reuben Martin, Co L, 7th Ohio Cavalry
Corporal George C. Schubach, Co B, 1st Ohio Cavalry

Researched & placed by:
Wayne Arnold, Dan Olinger, Jerry Olinger, James Parnell,
Dr Jack Dwyer & Maj Gen James H. Wilson Camp, SUVCW,
Col Christopher C. Pegues Camp, SCV
April 1, 2019

 
Erected 2019 by Maj. Gen James H. Wilson Camp, SUVCW & Col. Christopher C. Pegues Camp, SCV.
 
Location. 32° 44.33′ N, 86° 54.133′ W. Marker is in Stanton, Alabama, in Chilton County. Marker can be reached from County Road 45 0.3 miles west of State Route 22, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Located within the Ebenezer Baptist Church Cemetery (aka Stanton Community Church). Marker is in this post office area: Stanton AL 36790, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 6 other markers are within 17 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Memorial to Union Dead at Battle of Ebenezer Church (here, next to this marker); Ebenezer Church (a few steps from this marker); Maplesville United Methodist Church (approx. 4 miles away); Scandinavian Cemetery (approx. 15.9 miles away); Thorsby Remembers Our Veterans (approx. 16.3 miles away); Thorsby: A Scandinavian Colony in the South (approx. 16.4 miles away).
 
Also see . . .
Another nearby marker about the Battle of Ebenezer Church. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, May 7, 2019
3. Another nearby marker about the Battle of Ebenezer Church.
 Encyclopedia of Alabama on the Battle of Ebenezer Church). (Submitted on May 7, 2019, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Nearby DAR Memorial to the Union Dead. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, February 9, 2019
4. Nearby DAR Memorial to the Union Dead.
Apparently there are no documented listings of Southern soldiers killed in or near Stanton. This memorial, honoring Union troops, is unique because no public funds were used. Financial support came from a Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy.
 
More. Search the internet for Battle at Ebenezer Baptist Church.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 8, 2019. This page originally submitted on May 7, 2019, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 58 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on May 7, 2019, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
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