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Near Tybee Island in Chatham County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

5,275 Shots & Shells in 30 Hours

Fort Pulaski National Monument

 
 
5,275 Shots & Shells in 30 Hours Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, April 30, 2019
1. 5,275 Shots & Shells in 30 Hours Marker
Inscription.  Acting Brigadier General Quincy Adams Gillmore led the Union artillery attack on Fort Pulaski. Because the US Army originally built the fort, he knew its strengths and weaknesses and targeted the angle in front of you. Within range of Tybee Island—where he positioned artillery—it is directly in line with the fort's powder magazine. Gillmore's decision had the desired effect. Rifled artillery solid shots and exploding shells demolished Fort Pulaski's seven and one-half foot thick, solid brick walls during a 30-hour bombardment. Once considered unbreachable, the fort's walls proved no match for the spinning projectiles of this new technology.

Colonel Charles H. Olmstead surrendered the Confederate fort before the incoming shells exploded the powder magazine, which would have destroyed the entire garrison.

"[The] steel pointed shot bored through the brick walls as if they were so much paper… The science of war has leaped a century forward and all are behind the age!"
Captain George A. Mercer
Confederate Army, 1st Regiment Georgia Volunteer Infantry

"The result of this bombardment must cause…
Marker detail: Union forces garrisoned here after Confederate surrender worked to repair the damage image. Click for full size.
2. Marker detail: Union forces garrisoned here after Confederate surrender worked to repair the damage
a change in the construction of fortifications… No works of stone or brick can resist the impact of rifled artillery of heavy caliber."

Major General David Hunter
Union Army, Department of the South
 
Erected by National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Location. 32° 1.565′ N, 80° 53.398′ W. Marker is near Tybee Island, Georgia, in Chatham County. Marker can be reached from Fort Pulaski Road one mile north of U.S. 80. Touch for map. Marker is located at Fort Pulaski National Monument, overlooking the southeast corner of the fort from about 50 feet beyond the moat. Marker is in this post office area: Tybee Island GA 31328, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A Devastating Bombardment (within shouting distance of this marker); Federal Siege Batteries (within shouting distance of this marker); Through the Thick Brick Wall (within shouting distance of this marker); The Breached Wall (was within shouting distance of this marker but has been reported missing. ); Fort at Play (within shouting distance of this marker); Store House (within shouting distance of this marker); Southwest Bastion (within shouting distance of this marker); Southwest Magazine (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Tybee Island.
 
Related markers.
5,275 Shots & Shells Marker (<i>wide view • damaged south & east walls in background</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, April 30, 2019
3. 5,275 Shots & Shells Marker (wide view • damaged south & east walls in background)
Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. The Battle for Fort Pulaski
 
Also see . . .  Battle for Fort Pulaski. Gillmore was destined to play the leading role in the Fort Pulaski story and win for the fort a permanent niche in the military annals of the United States. He was familiar with the test records of a new weapon, the rifled gun, with which the Army had begun to experiment in 1859, and, on December 1, 1861, he broke with tradition and risked the laughter of his superiors. After a careful reconnaissance he reported to Sherman that it would be possible to reduce Fort Pulaski with mortars and rifled guns from Tybee Island. On this basis he submitted a complete plan for the attack on Fort Pulaski. Sherman approved the plan, but he made it clear that he doubted the usefulness of the rifled guns. (Submitted on May 22, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. ArchitectureForts, CastlesWar, US Civil
 
Fort Pulaski South Wall Damage & Moat<br>(<i>view from near marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, April 30, 2019
4. Fort Pulaski South Wall Damage & Moat
(view from near marker)
Fort Pulaski East Wall Damage & Moat image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, April 30, 2019
5. Fort Pulaski East Wall Damage & Moat
Fort Pulaski South Wall Embedded Cannonball<br>(<i>marker detail left • closeup photo right</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, April 30, 2019
6. Fort Pulaski South Wall Embedded Cannonball
(marker detail left • closeup photo right)
A few of the shots fired at the fort remain lodged in its thick, brick walls. Look for this shot near the top of the “7”-shaped scar.
 
More. Search the internet for 5,275 Shots & Shells in 30 Hours.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 23, 2019. This page originally submitted on May 21, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 56 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on May 22, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.
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