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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Cincinnati in Hamilton County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Camp Joy

 
 
Camp Joy Marker image. Click for full size.
By Rev. Ronald Irick, June 4, 2019
1. Camp Joy Marker
close up, side A
Inscription.  
Side A
Camp Joy was born at the site of Seven Hills Neighborhood House and original location of St. Barnabas Episcopal Mission Church. Displacement and loss caused by Ohio River flood of 1937 inspired St. Barnabasí rector and his wife, Laurence “Cap” and Sadie Hall, to act on behalf of the children of Cincinnatiís West End. The Halls conceived of Camp Joy as a haven where kids could find a respite from impoverished surroundings in the city and its sweltering summer heat. The camp was a success and continued after the Hallís assignment to another parish. From 1940-1944, Rev J. Brooke and Mrs. Betty Mosley continued to nurture the people of the West End through St. Barnabas and Camp Joy.

Side B
In 1945, St. Barnabas Episcopal and the West Cincinnati Presbyterian churches merged to preserve both congregations, whose memberships were declining. Under Presbyterian pastor Maurice “Mac” McCrackin the newly merged congregation voted in 1947 to integrate and welcome its Black neighbors. The merger integrated Camp Joy, too, making both church and camp trailblazers for integration in the area.
Camp Joy Marker image. Click for full size.
By Rev. Ronald Irick, June 4, 2019
2. Camp Joy Marker
close up, side B
After moving several times, Camp Joy found a home on 317 acres in Warren County, west of Clarkesville (Clinton County) in 1959. In 2017, Camp Joy celebrated its eightieth anniversary and welcomes more than 13,000 campers annually, including children facing medical challenges, in foster care, or enduring hardship. The camp also serves area schools by providing outdoor education programs and businesses by offering leadership and teambuilding retreats.
 
Erected 2018 by Camp Joy and The Ohio History Connection. (Marker Number 88-31.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Ohio Historical Society / The Ohio History Connection marker series.
 
Location. 39° 6.97′ N, 84° 31.766′ W. Marker is in Cincinnati, Ohio, in Hamilton County. Marker is at the intersection of Findlay Street and Baymiller Street, on the right when traveling east on Findlay Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 901 Findlay Street, Cincinnati OH 45214, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Cincinnati Breweries / Remaining Brewery Structures (approx. 0.4 miles away); Cincinnati Public Markets / The Northern Liberties (approx. half a mile away); Laurel-Lincoln World War II Memorial (approx. half a mile away);
Camp Joy Marker image. Click for full size.
By Rev. Ronald Irick, June 4, 2019
3. Camp Joy Marker
full view of marker
Anti-German Hysteria (approx. half a mile away); Site of Home Field of First Pro Baseball Team (approx. 0.6 miles away); John James Audubon in Cincinnati (approx. 0.6 miles away); Findlay Market / General James Findlay (approx. 0.6 miles away); Cincinnati Union Terminal (approx. 0.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Cincinnati.
 
More about this marker. Marker is incorrectly numbered
 
Categories. Charity & Public WorkChurches & ReligionParks & Recreational Areas
 
Camp Joy Marker image. Click for full size.
By Rev. Ronald Irick, June 4, 2019
4. Camp Joy Marker
marker as seen from a distance, showing site
Camp Joy Marker image. Click for full size.
By Rev. Ronald Irick, June 4, 2019
5. Camp Joy Marker
picture on marker
 

More. Search the internet for Camp Joy.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 10, 2019. This page originally submitted on June 5, 2019, by Rev. Ronald Irick of West Liberty, Ohio. This page has been viewed 34 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on June 5, 2019, by Rev. Ronald Irick of West Liberty, Ohio. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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