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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Reams in Dinwiddie County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Battle of Reams Station

Oak Grove United Methodist Church

 
 
The Battle of Reams Station - Oak Grove Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 22, 2008
1. The Battle of Reams Station - Oak Grove Church Marker
Inscription. In front of you is second location where the original church building stood after the Civil War. The first location was east of here and across the Civil War-era Halifax Road (now Acorn Drive). It was built around 1820 and first known as Hubbard's Meeting House; the church's name was changed to Oak Grove Methodist Church before the war.

Caught between two armies during the Battle of Reams Station, the little church served as a hospital for Union troops until they could be removed to their own lines. During the battle, the church received extensive damage. Parishioners filed a claim for damages with the federal government and received $750 which they used to move the damaged building across the road to this location.

Here, after a second story was added, the building served as a general store for many years. Meanwhile the parishioners built a new church where this one used to stand. It is still active today.
 
Erected by Civil War Preservation Trust.
 
Location. 37° 5.654′ N, 77° 25.315′ W. Marker is near Reams, Virginia, in Dinwiddie County. Marker is on Halifax Road (County Route 604) 0.1 miles north of Reams Drive (Route 606), on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Located in Civil
Help Preserve Reams Station image. Click for more information.
2. Help Preserve Reams Station
Click here for details of CWPT's efforts.
Click for more information.
War Preservation Trust's Reams Station Battlefield. The parking area is off Reams Drive. Marker is in this post office area: Petersburg VA 23805, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. North Carolina (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Battle of Reams Station (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named The Battle of Reams Station (about 700 feet away); Ream's Station (about 800 feet away); a different marker also named Ream's Station (about 800 feet away); a different marker also named The Battle of Reams Station (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named Reams Station (approx. 4.1 miles away); The Petersburg Railroad (approx. 4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Reams.
 
More about this marker. The background of the marker is a set of photos of the church captioned, After the Civil War, the Oak Grove United Methodist Church was moved and second story added (above), then a new church was rebuilt at the site of the original (background).
 
Also see . . .
1. Reams Station. National Park Service site detailing the phases of the
Oak Grove United Methodist Church Wayside image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 22, 2008
3. Oak Grove United Methodist Church Wayside
battle. (Submitted on November 23, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Reams Station Preservation Efforts. The Civil War Preservation Trust continues their work ensuring the battlefield at Reams Station is preserved. This site offers not only maps and additional information about the battle, but "clean" copies of the markers on site. Look on the right under Slideshows for the Reams Station Interpretive Trail. (Submitted on November 25, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Oak Grove United Methodist Church image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 22, 2008
4. Oak Grove United Methodist Church
The original church was a landmark in the June 22 skirmish, the June 29 battle, and the August 25 battle around Reams Station. A new church was built on the foundation of the wartime church. When the new church was built, planks from the original showed musket ball holes and embedded canister balls.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 23, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,119 times since then and 110 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on November 23, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on March 11, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3, 4. submitted on November 23, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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